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Research Initiatives

Translating Research into Clinical Care

One reason patients have access to the newest innovations and treatment options when they come to Kennedy Krieger is because the Institute is committed to research and to translating that research into practical clinical care. Joining research with clinical care improves long-term patient outcomes and heightens understanding of the mechanisms of brain injury.

The Institute’s Brain Injury Clinical Research Center is a leader in clinical research designed to improve the outcomes of children with brain injury. Our researchers collaborate with other Institute partners to understand not only the spectrum of injury and recovery from brain injury, but also parents’ primary questions and concerns, which in turn serve to inform research questions.

For example, our researchers have access to the F.M. Kirby Research Center for Functional Brain Imaging, which is recognized by the National Institutes of Health for the development and application of neuroimaging technology. Researchers at the Kirby Center use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to map the anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, connectivity, and function of the brain. In addition, The Center for Neurocognitive and Imaging Research investigates the underlying features and mechanisms of childhood brain disorders to improve identification and diagnosis and to develop novel therapies and effective interventions.

Currently Recruiting Research Studies

Learn more about currently recruiting brain injury-related research studies by visiting  Recruiting Research Studies page.

 

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