Current Fellows - Fourth Year Residents:

Brooke Kimbrell, MD

Birthplace/Hometown: My hometown is Dahlonega, Georgia.  It’s a historic rural gem tucked into the mountains.
College: I majored in biomedical engineering at Mercer University for my undergraduate and Masters Degrees and learned a lot about biomechanics, prosthetics, and assistive technology.
Medical School: Medical College of Georgia
Pediatrics: University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD

Reason for pursuing NDD and why Kennedy Krieger Institute: Brain development and the underlying neuroscience have always fascinated me. When I explored training in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities I found that it offers comprehensive and family centered assessment skills that I value. Kennedy Krieger Institute is the best possible place for me to learn these skills thanks to the strength and diversity of the multidisciplinary team here. The chance to work with the patients and families that come to this special institute is incredible! At Kennedy Krieger there is a unique focus on the practical needs of the individual and family while sustaining intellectual curiosity and growing our knowledge via research.


Jarrod Meadows, MD, PhD

Birthplace: Anardarko, OK
Hometown: Charlotte, NC
College: University of North Carolina, Charlotte
Medical School: University of Alabama School of Medicine
Pediatrics: Sinai Hospital of Baltimore

Reason for pursuing NDD and why Kennedy Krieger Institute: Exemplified by my prior MD/PhD training, my professional interests are simultaneously broad and hyper specialized. In the general sense, providing neurologic and developmental care is highly meaningful and rewarding. I also am fascinated by how the brain works on the basic science scale of individual neurons. For me, Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (NDD) training best allowed for the continued development of these interests. As to the question of “why Kennedy Krieger,” in my opinion the answer is clear: this is where NDD started, and where it continues most robustly both in terms of core philosophy and practical application.

What’s special about Baltimore? It's truly a city of neighborhoods, each rich with history and individual character.


Benjamin Schindel, MD

Birthplace/Hometown: Lawrenceville, New Jersey
College: Rutgers University
Medical School: SUNY Downstate College of Medicine and SUNY Downstate School of Public Health
Pediatrics: Mount Sinai Kravis Children’s Hospital, New York, NY

Reason for pursuing NDD and why Kennedy Krieger Institute: I chose to pursue a life working with disabled people after my experiences with Special Olympics New Jersey. In my pursuit to become this type of doctor I explored the idea of specializing in pediatric neurology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, med/peds, and developmental and behavioral pediatrics. NDD was the program of study that had the greatest focus on disabilities-first training with exceptional depth and breadth of exposure to these other specialties, and its mission to train leaders in the field, which spoke to my professional goals and interests. When it was time to choose a training program, Kennedy Krieger stood out as the gold standard of this mission in which I believe in so deeply. It is not only the place from which NDD started, but a freestanding institution for all aspects of disabilities care, which means that the training is comprehensive, historically rooted, and community-minded.

There is an astonishing amount of activity happening all the time throughout Kennedy Krieger, and the faculty welcome the NDD trainees with open arms, insightful feedback, and helpful connections to pursue our individual interests and goals. I have felt so supported in every encounter as I start to carve my own niche in the NDD world.


Daniel Simmonds, MD, PhD

Birthplace: Teaneck, NJ
College: Johns Hopkins University
Medical School: University of Pittsburgh
Pediatrics: University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD

Reason for pursuing NDD and why Kennedy Krieger Institute: I am Interested in brain development, individual differences and individual potential. I believe that our ability to emphasize people’s strengths and accommodate their weaknesses results in a better society for everyone, and caring for children with disabilities is in my eyes the best avenue to do this. There is no place like Kennedy Krieger as far as investigating and applying this approach, with extensive resources towards clinical care and academics/research.

What’s special about Baltimore? Baltimore is a fun, quirky place with lots of good music, art, and food. Lots of unique neighborhoods and beautiful affordable housing.


Current Fellows - Third Year Residents:

Ugur Damar MD

Hometown: Izmir, Turkey
Medical School: Medical Faculty of Bulent Ecevit University, Turkey
Pediatrics: Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia PA

Reason for pursuing NDD why Kennedy Krieger Institute: With the unique clinical experience and ample research opportunities the NDD training provides, I hope to develop a comprehensive understanding of disorders/variations in brain development and rare neurogenetic diseases. During my training, I aim to follow through the prominent aspect of my research, transcranial magnetic stimulation use as a biomarker for cortical plasticity or target engagement of centrally acting drugs, and help create avenues for research by incorporating innovative methods into conventional diagnostic/therapeutic tools. I believe the research opportunities and mentorship provided at Kennedy Krieger will help me obtain the necessary skillset as a clinician-scientist.

What’s special about Baltimore? Baltimore has always resonated pleasant feelings in me being a small harbor city with plenty of history similar to the towns close to where I grew up.


Archana Nelliot, MD

Birthplace: Doha, Qatar
Hometown: Vienna, VA
College: University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Medical School: Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
Pediatrics: Penn State Milton S. Hershey, Hershey, PA

Reason for pursing NDD and why Kennedy Krieger Institute: I discovered NDD as a specialty as a medical student, and after spending some time at Kennedy Krieger marveling at the depth and breadth of resources this place offers children with disabilities, meeting the incredible clinicians who work here and learning about the training and research opportunities, I could not imagine a better environment in which to train. 

What’s special about Baltimore? Baltimore has been home for me for almost 15 years now, and I love it. It has a lot to offer in terms of culture and things to do, while managing to be entirely affordable. It's a lovely place live!


Current Fellows - Second Year Residents:

Alizah Patterson, MD

Birthplace: Lahore, Pakistan
Hometown: Moore, Oklahoma
College: University of Oklahoma
Medical School: University of Oklahoma College of Medicine
Pediatrics: Sinai Hospital of Baltimore

Reason for pursing NDD and why Kennedy Krieger Institute: I have always been fascinated by the brain and how it works. When I began medical school, I knew I wanted to be involved in neurology and wanted to work with kids in my future career. When I did my child neurology rotation, I just felt that something was missing and that we were not looking at the whole child, just focusing on their neurologic issues. When I discovered neurodevelopmental disabilities as a specialty, it fit everything I was looking for. It was a holistic approach to children with NDD to not only treat their neurologic issues but to maximize their quality of life.

Kennedy Krieger Institute instantly felt like home when I interviewed here. The people are incredibly friendly and you can sense the community advocating for and encouraging their patients. I also greatly appreciated the curriculum that integrated adult neurology, pediatric neurology, and NDD throughout our training. This allows us to build on our knowledge and continue to apply it in different realms to best help our patients.

What’s special about Baltimore? Baltimore, and Maryland in general, is a great place to live no matter what your interests. In the city, there is excellent night life, concerts, the harbor. Slightly outside the city, you can find excellent hiking trails and outdoor sports. There is something to do for everyone, and the food here is fantastic. Can’t go wrong with crabcake!


Sara Shakin, MD

Hometown: Rockville, MD
College: Northwestern University
Medical School: Technion
Pediatrics: Sinai Hospital of Baltimore

Reason for pursing NDD and why Kennedy Krieger Institute: Through my pediatrics residency I discovered the field of NDD and found that it was able to encompass my interests of both neurology and development. I realized it is a field I could work with children with disabilities to help them achieve their potential. I was fortunate to rotate through Kennedy Krieger during my pediatrics training. During that time, I saw so many interesting cases and enjoyed the multidisciplinary approach.

What’s special about Baltimore? Baltimore is a city of many neighborhoods and therefore has something for everyone. Lots of places to eat, parks to go to, right on the water, and good hiking close by.


Current Fellows - First Year Residents:

Fabiola Morales Vias

Hometown: Dorado, Puerto Rico
College: University of Puerto Rico, Bayamón Puerto Rico
Medical School: Universidad Central del Caribe LCME Accredited, Bayamón, Puerto Rico
Pediatrics: San Juan City Hospital, San Juan Puerto Rico

Reason for pursing NDD and why Kennedy Krieger Institute: Throughout my training in pediatrics my interests in development, neuroscience, and patients with special needs stood out. The field of neurodevelopmental disabilities offers opportunities for scientific knowledge in pediatrics, neuroscience and research. It is a field that allows collaboration between health care professionals in diverse related fields with the common goal of helping children with disabilities in diagnosis and treatment. The Kennedy Krieger Institute was a pioneer in establishing NDD program and it offers the opportunity to work in an interprofessional manner with a supportive and broad faculty to offer comprehensive care to patients. At the Kennedy Krieger Institute there is a lot of opportunity for professional growth, education and research and commitment towards preparing professionals in an interdisciplinary matter. 

What’s special about Baltimore? There is a lot of history in Baltimore. There are a lot of places and activities going on around and near Baltimore and it’s great that you can always find something to do that’s interesting. I personally enjoy walking my dog around Patterson Park.


Kornkanok Saringkarisate

Hometown: Bangkok, Thailand 
Medical School:Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Thailand
Pediatrics: University of Hawaii Pediatric Residency Program, Honolulu, Hawaii 

Reason for pursing NDD and why Kennedy Krieger Institute: I have long been interested in child development. Apart from medical conditions, I am interested in social determinants of health such as caregivers, families, schools, and other community factors that play a significant role in outcomes, especially for children and families with disabilities. The NDD field provides a strong knowledge base in neurology to understand the etiology and pathophysiology while also allowing me to advocate for my patients and their families through schools, communities, and application of resources. NDD, especially at Kennedy Krieger, shows me endless possibilities - for my patients and for my career development and personal growth. 

What’s special about Baltimore? Baltimore is a very interesting city. Each neighborhood has their own unique vibe and hidden gems. Its proximity to other big cities provides easy access to attractions without having to live there yourself. There are plenty of good local ice cream and seafood places to explore complimented by a cool breeze by the harbor that feels refreshing at the end of the day.


 

Previous Fellows:

2002-2006

Jennifer Accardo, MD

Currently:
  • Faculty, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Child Development, Virginia Commonwealth University
   

2002-2006

Joshua Ewen, MD

Currently:
  • Director of Clinical Neurophysiology Laboratory, Kennedy Krieger Institute 
 
  • Faculty, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine 
   

2003-2007

Hilary E. Gwynn, MD

Currently:
  • Neurodevelopmental Medicine, Kennedy Krieger Institute
  • Faculty, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
   

2003-2007

Deepa Menon, MBBS

Currently:
  • Assistant Medical Director, Center for Autism Services, Science and Innovation (CASSI™, formerly known as the Center for Autism and Related Disorders, or CARD), Kennedy Krieger Institute
  • Faculty, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
   

2007-2012

Lisa Emrick, MD

Currently:
  • Faculty,  Department of Pediatric Neurology, Texas Children’s Hospital – Houston 
   

2007-2012

Sarah Risen, MD

Currently:
  • Faculty, Department of Pediatric Neurology and the Meyer Center for Developmental Pediatrics, Texas Children’s Hospital – Houston 
  • Program Director, Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Residency, Texas Children's Hospital - Houston
   

2008-2012

Ryan Lee, MD

Currently:
  • Pediatric Neurologist, Director of the Neurodevelopmental Clinic, Director of Medical Research, Shriners Hospitals for Children – Honolulu 
   

2008-2012

Mihee J. Bay, MD

Currently:
  • Neurodevelopmental Pediatrician, Kennedy Krieger Institute
  • Faculty, Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
   

2009-2013

Joan Jasien, MD

Currently:
  • Neurologist, Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center 
  • Faculty, Department of Pediatrics, Duke University School of Medicine
   

2009-2013

Eboni Lance, MD, PhD

Currently:
  • Associate Director of the Neurology and Neurogenetics Clinic at Kennedy Krieger Institute
  • Co-Medical Director of the Sickle Cell Neurodevelopmental Clinic, Kennedy Krieger Institute 
 
  • Faculty, Department of Neurology and Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine 
   

2010-2014

Vera J. Burton, MD, PhD

Currently:
  • Neurologist, Kennedy Krieger Institute
  • Faculty, Department of Neurology and Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
   

2011-2015

Mary Lee Gregory, MD, PhD

Currently:
  • Neurologist and Epileptologist, Prisma Health Richland Hospital, Columbia, SC
   

2012-2016

Jacqueline Harris, MD

Currently:
  • Neurologist, Kennedy Krieger Institute
  • Faculty, Pediatrics, Neurology, Genetics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
   

2012-2016

Siddharth Srivastava, MD

Currently:
  • Neurologist, Boston Children's Hospital
  • Faculty, Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School
   

2013-2018

Tara Johnson, MD

Currently:
  • Neurologist, Arkansas Children’s Hospital
  • Faculty, Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Medicine
  • Founding Director of Arkansas Children’s Biomedical Innovations Program
  • Member of the Arkansas Children’s Research Institute Center for Translational Pediatric Research
   

2013-2017

Meghan O'Neill, MD

Currently:
  • Neurology and Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago
  • Faculty, Department of Neurology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
   

2014-2018

Eliza Gordon-Lipkin, MD

Currently:
  • Staff Clinician, National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)
   

2014-2018

Fatima Ismail, MBSS

Currently:
  • Neurologist, United Arab Emirates
  • Faculty, Department of Pediatrics, UAE University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates

2015-2019

Ryan Gill, MD

Currently:
  • Neurologist and Director of Tuberous Sclerosis Clinic, Kennedy Krieger Institute
  • Faculty, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
   

2015-2020

Cathleen Marshall, MD

Currently:
  • Neurodevelopmental Pediatrician, Anchorage, AK

2016-2020

Amena Smith Fine, MD, PhD

Currently:
  • Neurologist, Kennedy Krieger Institute
  • Faculty, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

2016-2021

Eric Chin, MD

Currently:
  • Neurologist, Kennedy Krieger Institute
  • Faculty, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
 
   

2016-2021

Clay Smith, MD

Currently
  • Neurologist, Kennedy Krieger Institute
  • Faculty, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
 
   

2019-2023

Meghna Rajaprakash, MD

Currently
  • Faculty, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Neurdevelopmental Disabilities Residency Program Application