Vikram S.
Chib
,
PhD

Vikram S. Chib, Ph.D.'s picture
Research Scientist
Phone: 443-923-1869
Kennedy Krieger Institute

707 E. Broadway, G-04
Baltimore, MD 21205
United States

About

Dr. Vikram Chib is an assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and a research scientist at Kennedy Krieger Institute.

Education

Dr. Chib obtained his bachelor's degree in bioengineering at the University of Pittsburgh, and earned a master of science degree and Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Northwestern University. Following his Ph.D., Dr. Chib was a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Postdoctoral Fellow at Advanced Telecommunications Research (ATR) in Kyoto, Japan. Before coming to Johns Hopkins, he was a postdoctoral scholar in the Division of Biology and Biological Engineering at the California Institute of Technology and a member of the Computation & Neural Systems and Behavioral & Social Neuroscience programs.

Research

The goal of Dr. Chib’s research is to understand how the human brain processes internal and external rewards, and how these signals motivate behavior. To this end, his group uses methods from computational neuroscience, behavioral economics, functional imaging, and noninvasive brain stimulation. Dr. Chib aims to translate his basic findings of the how the brain represents motivated behavior to the design of incentive mechanisms and noninvasive brain stimulation protocols that reduce neurological and psychological impairments.

Research Publications 

Chib VS, Yun K, Takahashi H, Shimojo S (2013). Noninvasive remote activation of the ventral midbrain by transcranial direct current stimulation of prefrontal cortex. Transl Psychiatry. 3, e268.

Chib VS, De Martino B, Shimojo S, O'Doherty JP (2012). Neural mechanisms underlying paradoxical performance for monetary incentives are driven by loss aversion. Neuron. 74(3), 582-94.

Chib VS, Rangel A, Shimojo S, O'Doherty JP (2009). Evidence for a common representation of decision values for dissimilar goods in human ventromedial prefrontal cortex. J Neurosci. 29(39), 12315-20.