M.E.B. Lewis, Ed.D.

Dr. M.E.B. Lewis
M.E.B. Lewis
Director, Special Education Projects

Kennedy Krieger Institute
3825 Greenspring Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21211
Phone: (443) 923-7822
Email: lewismeb@kennedykrieger.org

Dr. Lewis is the director of projects that introduce or extend knowledge of special education policy, interventions or information to both Kennedy Krieger staff and others in the outside community of educators, families, colleges, universities, agencies and community or business groups.


Biographical Sketch:

Dr. Lewis received her bachelor's degree in English and philosophy from Towson State College and continued her graduate education at Johns Hopkins University, where she received a master's degree as a reading specialist, and a doctorate in human communication disorders. She taught English and was a reading specialist in Baltimore City public schools for nine years before coming to Kennedy Krieger as principal of its school in 1980.

She has served in the capacity of principal and education director on both the Fairmount and Greenspring campuses, where both the elementary and middle schools were honored as National Blue Ribbon Schools. She has also worked at the Maryland State Department of Education as a specialist in non-public schools. For five years, she was the Director of the Center for Reading Excellence at Johns Hopkins University before returning to Kennedy Krieger in 2005.

Dr. Lewis remains connected to the Maryland State Department of Education through her appointment on the Professional Standards in Teacher Education Board and her continuing participation on the Committee for the Redesign of Reading Curriculum. She has taught at Johns Hopkins University's School of Education for over 25 years, and serves on the Neuro-Education committee there.

She consults with schools and school districts throughout the region, providing training to teachers, support staff, administrators and district leadership teams.


Research Summary:

Dr. Lewis' research interests include the neurological aspects of learning, and particularly, the disabling conditions that contribute to reading, writing and language deficits.