Cerebral Palsy

Therapy to a Tee

July 8, 2011
Constraint-induced and Bimanual Therapy Program incorporates golf to help one patient on his path to rehabilitation.

Taylor Wilkerson works with golf pro Kelly Tomlinson to improve his swingFrom the beginning, and without hesitation, Katherine Wilkerson always offered her unwavering support of anything her son Taylor wanted to do. The thing is, though, until the age of 9, there was never much of anything the boy was too interested in trying.

Changing Our Communities for the Better

Children at PlayIt's a gorgeous day in late summer, and there's a crowd at the local putt-putt golf course. The sounds of waterfalls and laughter float on the breeze. At the sixth hole, a group of kids gather around their friend as he squares up and aims to sink a hole in one. With a sharp tap, the ball sails down the green, around a corner and under a windmill.

Research Frontiers: Piecing Together the Mystery of Autism

Courtney
Jolley
Kennedy Krieger takes a multifaceted approach to investigating this complex disorder

The Maloni BoysMore than 25,000 children will be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders this year a number greater than AIDS, diabetes, and cancer combined yet so many aspects of the disorder remain a mystery. Is its cause genetic, environmental, or some combination of factors? Are dietary changes and drugs the best hope for treatment, or should the focus remain solely on behavioral interventions?

I Can Skate

Meredith
Purvis
April 1, 2010
Dorothy Hamill's adaptive skating program gives children with physical disabilities a chance to soar

Dorothy HamillThe lobby of the ice rink hums with excitement as children laugh and talk while their parents bundle them up and help them get their skates on. In one corner, a little boy grins from ear to ear as his dad helps him to his feet and his mom snaps photo after photo. Across the room, another mom keeps a careful eye on her son as he practices walking in his skates, one hand on the wall for stability.

Feels Like Home

Courtney
McGrath
Foster Care Program Becomes Gateway to Adoption for Children with Special Needs

Davona MillerJim Schuyler had a big decision to make last February. Diane Stegman, one of the Program Coordinators for the Therapeutic Family Care program, wanted to know whether he and his wife, Karen, could manage to care for one more child. That day, caseworkers from the Department of Social Services had removed Dante,* a 2-year-old boy with spina bifida, from a home where his needs could not be met.

Targeting Tumors

Courtney
McGrath
Research and Care Programs at Kennedy Krieger Work to Minimize the Damage Caused by Brain Cancer

Nicole BahenIf you've ever doubted how quickly your life can be turned upside down, just ask the Bahen family. On Monday, Nov. 14, 2000, the Bahens' 5-year-old daughter Nicole joined her friends for her usual afternoon dance class. By Sunday Nov. 20, Nicole lay in intensive care recovering from surgery, unable to speak, roll over or swallow, nearly paralyzed on her right side. Such is the swift devastation of a pediatric brain tumor.

Tender Loving Care

Courtney
McGrath
Daycare Fills Gap in Services for Children with Special Medical Needs

Children at World of CareFor parents of children with special medical needs, returning to the workforce is often a necessity, not an option. They need the income and health benefits a job provides. But finding quality childcare can be nearly impossible.

Building Stronger Bones

Courtney
Jolley
Osteogenesis Imperfecta Clinic extends services to children with a variety of conditions

Logan Insley with Dr. ShapiroLoss of bone density is a concern commonly associated with the elderly, for whom a simple stumble can easily result in a painful, debilitating fracture. But a variety of other conditions can make low bone density a lifetime challenge, one best addressed as early as possible.

Never Say Never

Elise
Babbitt
Determined Young Woman Refuses to Let Cerebral Palsy Conquer Her Dreams

Liza Patchel and Her MomLiza Patchel has grown used to being told of the many things she will never do. Diagnosed with cerebral palsy as an infant, doctors said she would never speak or walk. When she enrolled in public school, administrators said she would never play for their sports teams. Even as she studied her way to good grades, "experts" told Liza that she would never go to college.

The Next Generation

Courtney
McGrath
Each Year, Hundreds of Professionals Come to Kennedy Krieger for Invaluable Training

Professional Training at Kennedy KriegerWhen today's Kennedy Krieger Institute first opened its doors in 1967, its leaders were expected to continue and improve the state-of-the-art treatment services already available to children with cerebral palsy at the Children's Rehabilitation Institute, the original facility that became Kennedy Krieger, and to extend those services to children with a variety of other neurodevelopment

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