Letter from our President

July 8, 2011

Gary W. Goldstein, MDThe most basic definition of the word “potential” is a possibility that’s capable of existing in reality.

At Kennedy Krieger, it seems we’re redefining what those possibilities are.

In this issue, you’ll meet several students and patients who faced circumstances and conditions that some professionals deemed insurmountable. When he was diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome, Kevin Sargeant’s family worried whether he would ever thrive in grade school, let alone go to college. Morgan Dunnigan’s family was told she would never walk again. And Taylor Wilkinson, a patient with cerebral palsy and a hemiparesis in his right arm, defies the odds every day as a promising young golfer who turned to Kennedy Krieger’s Constraint-Induced and Bimanual Therapy Program to help improve his swing.

It’s a story we hear often: So many of our patients come to us with grim prognoses, having been told that their best hope is learning to live with their illness or injury. But here, they find optimism and hope. For the individuals you’ll read about in this issue, what others believed to be impossible became realistic when their own perseverance and determination met that of the physicians, therapists, nurses, teachers, and other care givers at Kennedy Krieger who devote themselves to helping children reach their full potential.

All of these patients—and the numerous providers and caregivers who work alongside them—are living, breathing examples of how seriously Kennedy Krieger takes its mission of helping children everywhere to realize the potential they were born with. Their stories are both incredible and a valuable testament not only to the work we do, but to the potential inside so many people, given the right care and support.

Sincerely,

Gary W. Goldstein, M.D.