Letter From Our President

Gary W. Goldstein, MDWhen someone you love lives through a horrific accident, the first impulse is to rejoice in their survival. But often, the immediate aftermath of an accident is just the first step in a long, sometimes arduous journey to recovery. Some elements of their "previous" life may return, but others are often changed irrevocably. That's been the case for the Frost family. A December 2004 car accident left two of the Frost children with serious brain injuries. The children have spent months working through the different phases of Kennedy Krieger's Brain Injury Program, from intense inpatient care to daily treatment, home assistance and outpatient therapy. The Frosts' story is featured in this issue of potential.

This issue also spotlights the Kennedy Krieger Family Center, now in its 20th year of helping children and their families heal from abuse, neglect, community violence and other trauma. Our Success Story features a young woman with cerebral palsy who has spent her entire life proving naysayers wrong, and who has become an accomplished student with plans to pursue clinical psychology.

Learn more about the multi-sensory environment available at one of Kennedy Krieger's school programs, and how it helps students with autism spectrum disorders meet their therapeutic goals. Finally, our research feature focuses on Dr. Rebecca Landa's work exploring the signs that indicate when a language delay is a sign of a more significant disability.

The professionals, families and, especially, the children of Kennedy Krieger never cease to amaze me with their accomplishments. In reading this issue of potential, I hope you feel the same.

Sincerely,

Gary W. Goldstein, MD
President