Feature Stories

Courtney McGrath • December 06, 2005
Cranial-Cervical Clinic Focuses on Prevention and Treatment of Head Tilts and Malformations

Little Eric Miller* had a rough start in life. Struggling with severe acid reflux from the time he was just a few days old, he spent much of his first few months shuttling from one doctor to another, enduring countless X-rays, CT scans and other tests. Mom Brenda Baker*, desperate to relieve his discomfort, decided to keep him propped up as much as possible, even putting him in his car seat to sleep.

Courtney Jolley • November 21, 2005
A year after a horrifying car accident, siblings fight to regain skills and abilities in Kennedy Krieger Brain Injury program
The Frost Family

For the Frost family, the first miracle happened when their family survived a horrific car crash that could easily have ended in tragedy.

In the months since the accident, other miracles, large and small, have transformed the Frosts. As Gemma Frost, now 7, and big brother Graeme, 10, have continued to recover from brain injuries sustained in the crash, the family has learned that every milestone reached can bring new challenges and joys, and that recovery from such critical injuries is a constantly evolving process that can affect every facet of life for both the injured and those who love and care for them. 

Allison Foreman • November 08, 2005
Kennedy Krieger Center Focuses on Improving Identification of Rare Sturge-Weber Syndrome
Kyle Watson with His Mom Colleen

The day Colleen Watson delivered her son Kyle was one of the happiest days of her life. But almost immediately, Watson and her husband Tom were faced with the possibility that the port wine stain that covered Kyle's eyelid, crossed his forehead and circled around the back of his head was more than a birthmark, that it could be a sign of Sturge-Weber Syndrome...

Courtney McGrath • September 21, 2005
Innovative Program Encourages Children to Develop Their Weaker Limbs

When you first look at Brianna Robinson, you might not realize that she has cerebral palsy. She does a lot of the same things most other 2 1/2-year-old girls do: she walks and runs, plays with dolls and eagerly reaches for favorite treats. But look closer and you notice that while Brianna enjoys a lot of the same games and activities as other kids her age, she tends to do them with just one hand.

Courtney McGrath • September 06, 2005
Art and Music Therapy Give Kids with Disabilities an Outlet for Their Thoughts and Emotions

Not everyone can create a masterpiece of art or music, poetry or dance a gift like that is all the more special because it is rare. But the process of creating art is a gift unto itself, empowering and life enhancing. For children with disabilities, art can be especially valuable in helping them communicate thoughts and feelings that might otherwise stay locked inside or end up expressed in inappropriate ways.

Courtney McGrath • December 15, 2004
Early Interventions Can Bring Out the Chatterbox in Children
Madelyn Dennis with Her Therapist

Few experiences thrill a parent more than the first time they hear their child say "mama" or "dada." Those words, often a baby's first, are usually followed by a flurry of new ones, and eventually phrases, thoughts, questions and observations that give parents constantly new glimpses of the unique person their child is becoming.

Courtney McGrath • December 10, 2004
Simmons Girls and Their Mom with Doctor

Like all siblings, the six Simmons girls are unique in almost every way. Adopted in early childhood by Betty Simmons of Baltimore and her late husband Gregory, they have their individual interests, temperaments and strengths. 

Courtney McGrath • December 01, 2004
Dr. Jonathan Pevsner

The complex workings of living creatures have fascinated thinkers for centuries. In the fourth century B.C., Aristotle observed hundreds of species, dissecting dozens, in the hopes of classifying them logically. Revered Renaissance artist Leonardo da Vinci performed crude, but innovative, experiments, injecting hot wax into the cerebral ventricles of an ox, dissecting the ox after the wax had hardened in order to discern the precise shape of the ventricles.

Courtney McGrath • November 25, 2004
In a First-of-Its-Kind Study, Researchers Will Learn Why So Many Adolescent Students Struggle to Read and How to Effectively Intervene.
The Importance of Effective Reading Skills

Most adults cannot recall exactly how they learned to read, or even remember a time when they couldn't. Reading is so integral to our lives that most of us take it for granted. It's fundamental to a quality education, essential to our jobs and an escape from mundane day-to-day rituals into worlds of adventure, glamour and intrigue.

Courtney McGrath • November 16, 2004
Teenager Joins Elite Athletes from Across the Globe at Athens Paralympics
Racing to Victory

For those who wonder if childhood adversity really can inspire remarkable achievements, look no further than Tatyana McFadden. 

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