Inspiring Stories

Animal assisted therapy helped motivate and lift the spirits of animal lover Destiny Fallas during her rehabilitation from transverse myelitis.
When Destiny Fallas came down with a cold last fall, her parents didn’t think much of it at first. But within 24 hours, Destiny lost the ability to talk, swallow, or eat. After being admitted to the hospital, she continued to worsen and became completely paralyzed.
For the Heck family, who have raised over $1 million for Sturge-Weber syndrome research, a medical breakthrough by Kennedy Krieger offers hope for new treatments and possibly a cure in daughter Jenna’s lifetime.
Ida Heck has been waiting for a medical breakthrough in Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) ever since her daughter Jenna was diagnosed with the disorder as an infant nine years ago. But she soon discovered that because the disorder was so rare—only one person in 20,000 has SWS—there was very little research being conducte
For Sarah and Jason Edwards’ two daughters, Kennedy Krieger exhausted every option to give a definitive diagnosis for one, and help allay concerns about the other.
Sarah Edwards knew something was not right with her daughter Madison when she was only an infant. Madison was a beautiful child, but she was not engaging or babbling, or hitting developmental milestones. “I had a gut feeling something was not right,” recalls Sarah. “When you get that feeling, that maternal instinct…I just knew.”
When Lily was three, her entire family was in a car accident that left her paralyzed and her family shattered. Kennedy Krieger’s Camp SOAR helped them heal again.
A moment of screeching tires and crumpling metal, and Lily Wilkinson’s new life appeared to be etched in stone before she had even entered kindergarten. Her neck broken, Lily was left paralyzed below the waist at the age of three.
A military dad requests and receives a compassionate reassignment to Baltimore so his daughter can once again receive the expert care she needs for her rare genetic disorder at Kennedy Krieger.
With her big bright eyes, auburn curls, and contagious giggle, 5-year-old Megan Miceli is truly one in a million. You could even say she’s one in a billion—Megan has a genetic disorder so rare that only a handful of cases have been reported in the world. Since she was a baby, she has been under the care of neurologists at Kennedy Krieger who, after extensive testing, diagnosed her with gene microdeletion 15q13.3.
Throughout her rehabilitation from paralysis at Kennedy Krieger, the dream of one day riding horses again kept Krystal motivated.
Krystal Greco had been an avid horseback rider since she was a small child. But one afternoon when she was 14, a searing pain in her back changed everything.
Former Kennedy Krieger trainee Dr. Tanjala Gipson now heads up the Tuberous Sclerosis Clinic that gives one-year-old Mason Ditch hope for his future.
Former Kennedy Krieger trainee Dr. Tanjala Gipson now heads up the Tuberous Sclerosis Clinic that gives one-year-old Mason Ditch hope for his future.
After Therapeutic Foster Care gave him a second chance at life, Carl Price is paying it forward by mentoring foster children.
After Therapeutic Foster Care gave him a second chance at life, Carl Price is paying it forward by mentoring foster children. Ask Carl Price about his childhood, and you can’t help but feel moved by the struggles he faced as a young boy in Baltimore 25 years ago. With a father in jail and a mother struggling with addiction, Carl wasn’t sure when his next meal would come, let alone his next medical checkup. So when young Carl developed a tumor on the left side of his neck, it was left untreated for over a year. By the time Carl’s mother took him to the hospital at age 13, he had developed advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma—a type of throat cancer.
Darius Weems, star of "Darius Goes West," participates in groundbreaking research for the fatal disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which took the life of his brother at age 19.
Darius Weems, star of "Darius Goes West," participates in groundbreaking research for the fatal disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which took the life of his brother at age 19.
Kennedy Krieger used innovative genetic sequencing technology to diagnose two brothers who were “undiagnosable” for more than 20 years, leading the way for other families to find answers. 
Kennedy Krieger used innovative genetic sequencing technology to diagnose two brothers who were “undiagnosable” for more than 20 years, leading the way for other families to find answers.

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