Inspiring Stories

A year after a horrifying car accident, siblings fight to regain skills and abilities in Kennedy Krieger Brain Injury program
The Frost Family

For the Frost family, the first miracle happened when their family survived a horrific car crash that could easily have ended in tragedy.

In the months since the accident, other miracles, large and small, have transformed the Frosts. As Gemma Frost, now 7, and big brother Graeme, 10, have continued to recover from brain injuries sustained in the crash, the family has learned that every milestone reached can bring new challenges and joys, and that recovery from such critical injuries is a constantly evolving process that can affect every facet of life for both the injured and those who love and care for them. 

The Family Center's Clinical Initiatives Help Children Recover from Trauma
Healing from Trauma

Each year, more than 900,000 children in the United States experience physical or sexual abuse, community or domestic violence, neglect or abandonment. Many of these traumatic incidents occur within the caregiving system that is supposed to protect children. 

Kennedy Krieger Center Focuses on Improving Identification of Rare Sturge-Weber Syndrome
Kyle Watson with His Mom Colleen

The day Colleen Watson delivered her son Kyle was one of the happiest days of her life. But almost immediately, Watson and her husband Tom were faced with the possibility that the port wine stain that covered Kyle's eyelid, crossed his forehead and circled around the back of his head was more than a birthmark, that it could be a sign of Sturge-Weber Syndrome...

Innovative Program Encourages Children to Develop Their Weaker Limbs

When you first look at Brianna Robinson, you might not realize that she has cerebral palsy. She does a lot of the same things most other 2 1/2-year-old girls do: she walks and runs, plays with dolls and eagerly reaches for favorite treats. But look closer and you notice that while Brianna enjoys a lot of the same games and activities as other kids her age, she tends to do them with just one hand.

Research and Care Programs at Kennedy Krieger Work to Minimize the Damage Caused by Brain Cancer
Nicole Bahen

If you've ever doubted how quickly your life can be turned upside down, just ask the Bahen family. On Monday, Nov. 14, 2000, the Bahens' 5-year-old daughter Nicole joined her friends for her usual afternoon dance class. By Sunday Nov. 20, Nicole lay in intensive care recovering from surgery, unable to speak, roll over or swallow, nearly paralyzed on her right side. Such is the swift devastation of a pediatric brain tumor.

Researchers at Kennedy Krieger Investigate Whether Energy Therapy Can Benefit Children with Developmental Disabilities

To an outsider, it looks like the small boy is having fun with a baby-sitter. As he moves from toy to toy, his "sitter" follows him, occasionally placing her hands on his arms and legs. She tries to touch his head, but he pushes her hand away. She spends a lot of time pressing lightly on his chest. When he gets tired, she keeps applying light pressure as he becomes more and more relaxed. As the boy starts to nod off, she steps back, ending the session.

Boy Undergoes Dramatic Surgery, Therapy to Lengthen Short Limb
Tyler Kiskis

At 5 years old, Tyler Kiskis is a bundle of energy, a little spark-plug with tossled brown hair and an impish grin who revels in the things that most 5-year-old boys do baseball and soccer, chasing the family Labrador, jumping through a water sprinkler in the front yard of his family's Pasadena home.

A Child's Work Is to Play, But Not All Children Know How. Several Programs at Kennedy Krieger Teach Them -- For the Sake of More Than Just Amusement.
Corey Opher, Jr.

The playroom of Kennedy Krieger Institute's Achievements program doesn't look like a typical child's playroom. There are no blocks, books, dolls or trucks lining the shelves or scattered about the floor. In fact, the room seems practically devoid of toys, those things that inspire the imaginations of children but it's not. They're here, stored neatly in clear plastic bins, one to a container, each labeled with a picture and a word describing its contents.

Kennedy Krieger Researcher Uses Innovations in MRI Technology to Study the Brain's Structure and Function in Search of the Cause of ADHD
Erin Blitz with Dr. Stewart Mostofsky

Laurie Blitz began to suspect that something was not quite right with her daughter as early as when she was a toddler. Erin seemed overly hyperactive, moving so much that even simple tasks like changing her diaper became lessons in patience and control. When she was old enough to walk, she would constantly run away, placing herself in danger. 

Kennedy Krieger's Pediatric Psychology Program Helps Calm Children's Fears of Medical Procedures by Teaching Them What to Expect, What to Do, and How to Relax
Sam Spring

Last year, 5-year-old Samuel Spring came to Kennedy Krieger Institute for evaluation of autism. The genetic and metabolic tests he was to undergo required giving a blood sample. When the nurse tried to tie the tourniquet around his arm in preparation for the needle stick, Sam began to cry and break away. 

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