Kennedy Krieger Physician to Help Develop Clinical Guidelines for Children with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

September 14, 2012

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) appointed Dr. Stacy Suskauer, Director of Brain Injury Rehabilitation Programs at Kennedy Krieger Institute, to a work group developing clinical diagnosis and management guidelines for acute mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) among children and teens.

Appropriate diagnosis and management of children and teens with mild TBI, including concussion, can help safeguard the health of young Americans. While clinical guidelines are available for adults with mild TBI, there are no current U.S. guidelines to help clinicians care for children and teens with mild TBI. The work group is looking at injuries that occur both on and off the sports field.

Established by the CDC National Center for Injury Prevention and Control’s Board of Scientific Counselors, the Pediatric Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Guideline Workshop is comprised of leading experts in the field of TBI. The workgroup will develop clinical diagnosis and management guidelines for acute mild TBI among children and teens within an 18-24 month time frame.

Clinical guidelines, such as these, help the CDC put science into action to improve the care children and teens with mild TBI receive each day in doctor’s offices and emergency departments across the country.  In addition, these guidelines will fill an important gap and help ensure consistent and evidence-based care of young patients with mild TBI.

Dr. Suskauer is board-certified in pediatrics and physical medicine and rehabilitation. She holds a subspecialty certification in pediatric rehabilitation medicine. In addition to her clinical leadership of the Brain Injury Program, Dr. Suskauer is a research scientist and Co-Director of the Limb Differences Clinic at Kennedy Krieger.

For more information on the CDC workgroup, please visit: http://www.cdc.gov/traumaticbraininjury/MTBI_pediatric.html.

About Kennedy Krieger Institute
Internationally recognized for improving the lives of children and adolescents with disorders and injuries of the brain and spinal cord, the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, MD serves more than 18,000 individuals each year through inpatient and outpatient clinics, home and community services and school-based programs. Kennedy Krieger provides a wide range of services for children with developmental concerns mild to severe, and is home to a team of investigators who are contributing to the understanding of how disorders develop while pioneering new interventions and earlier diagnosis. For more information on Kennedy Krieger Institute, visit www.kennedykrieger.org.