Gender Differences in High Functioning Autism

May 16, 2018, 11:30 am to 12:30 pm

The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the sex and gender differences that occur in high functioning autism. While evidence may suggest that more boys than girls are affected, this ratio could be exaggerated with unintentionally biased evaluations and by the abilities of women and girls with ASD to 'camouflage' their symptoms, thus preventing them from being diagnosed or receiving services. A lack of understanding of these sex and gender differences could be limiting our understanding of ASD as a whole.

Objectives:

  • To discuss the differences in the presentation of autism symptoms in boys and girls with high functioning autism.
  • To discuss how treatments and supports may differ according these gender differences.

Presenter:

  • Emily Dillon, Ph.D

    Dr. Dillon is currently a post-doc fellow with Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins University. She completed her Ph.D. in Trinity College, University of Dublin, Ireland where she investigated gender differences in girls and boys with ASD. Her interests lie in social language, gender differences and how we diagnosis and define autism. 

Location:

Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD)
Kennedy Krieger Institute
3901 Greenspring Avenue
Creamer Building
Third Floor, Large Conference Room
Baltimore, MD 21211

Audience:

Parents, family members and professionals

This is a FREE training! To register, visit www.kennedykriegercard.eventbrite.com or call Hanna Hutter at (443) 923-7596.

Bradley L. Schlaggar, M.D., Ph.D., Named President and CEO of Kennedy Krieger Institute

We’re thrilled to welcome Bradley L. Schlaggar, M.D., Ph.D., to the Kennedy Krieger family as our next President and CEO.
Learn more.

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