Paediatric in-hospital cardiac arrest: Factors associated with survival and neurobehavioural outcome one year later.

Mark McIntosh,'s picture
PubMed URL: 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29317348
Author: 
Moler FW
Author List: 
Meert K
Telford R
Holubkov R
Slomine BS
Christensen JR
Berger J
Ofori-Amanfo G
Newth CJL
Dean JM
Moler FW
Journal: 
Resuscitation
PubMed ID: 
29317348
Pagination: 
96-105
Volume: 
124
Abstract: 
To investigate clinical characteristics associated with 12-month survival and neurobehavioural function among children recruited to the Therapeutic Hypothermia after Paediatric Cardiac Arrest In-Hospital trial.Children (n = 329) with in-hospital cardiac arrest who received chest compressions for ≥2 min, were comatose, and required mechanical ventilation after return of circulation were included. Neurobehavioural function was assessed using the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales, second edition (VABS-II) at baseline (reflecting pre-arrest status) and 12 months post-arrest. Norms for VABS-II are 100 (mean) ±15 (SD). Higher scores indicate better functioning. Outcomes included 12-month survival, 12-month survival with VABS-II decreased by ≤15 points from baseline, and 12-month survival with VABS-II ≥70.Asystole as the initial arrest rhythm, administration of >4 adrenaline doses, and higher post-arrest blood lactate concentration were independently associated with lower 12-month survival; an adrenaline dosing interval of 3-<5 min and open chest compressions were independently associated with greater 12-month survival. Use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and higher blood lactate were independently associated with lower 12-month survival with VABS-II decreased by ≤15 points from baseline; open chest compressions was independently associated with greater 12-month survival with VABS-II decreased by ≤15 points. Asystole as the initial rhythm, use of ECMO, and higher blood lactate were independently associated with lower 12-month survival with VABS-II ≥70; open chest compressions was independently associated with greater 12-month survival with VABS-II ≥70.Cardiac arrest and resuscitation factors are associated with long-term survival and neurobehavioural function among children who are comatose after in-hospital arrest.
Published Date: 
March, 2018

Bradley L. Schlaggar, M.D., Ph.D., Named President and CEO of Kennedy Krieger Institute

We’re thrilled to welcome Bradley L. Schlaggar, M.D., Ph.D., to the Kennedy Krieger family as our next President and CEO.
Learn more.

Appointments & Referrals

FIND A SPECIALIST

Publications

Read inspiring stories, news and updates about the Institute's patient care, research, special education, professional training, and community programs.

 

Resource Finder

 

A free resource that provides access to information and support for individuals and families living with developmental disabilities.