Emotional and neuropsychological profiles of children with complex regional pain syndrome type-I in an inpatient rehabilitation setting.

Mark McIntosh,'s picture
PubMed URL: 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20842016
Author: 
Salorio CF
Author List: 
Cruz N
O'Reilly J
Slomine BS
Salorio CF
Journal: 
Clin J Pain
PubMed ID: 
20842016
Pagination: 
27-34
Volume: 
27
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 
Examine the emotional and neuropsychological profiles of pediatric Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type-I in an inpatient setting.Seventeen children and adolescents (all female; ages 9 to 18 y) admitted to an inpatient rehabilitation facility who completed neuropsychological assessments that included emotional functioning questionnaires, projective personality measures, and neuropsychological measures.Consistent evidence for somatization was found. Thirty-eight percent of patients exhibited at-risk/elevated mood symptoms (anxiety or depression) based on self-report or parent report. Overall, few patients exhibited at risk/impaired neuropsychological test composite scores. A sizable proportion of patients (36%), however, showed at risk/impaired attention/working memory composite scores.Children with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type-I may experience emotional distress that is better identified through using multiple assessment methods. Results provide support for an elevated risk of somatic symptoms and emotional distress, especially anxiety, among certain individuals in this population. Results also provide preliminary evidence for an elevated risk of difficulties with attention/working memory.
Published Date: 
January, 2011

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