Clinical trial of docosahexaenoic acid in patients with retinitis pigmentosa receiving vitamin A treatment.

Mark McIntosh,'s picture
PubMed URL: 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15364708
Author: 
Schaefer EJ
Author List: 
Berson EL
Rosner B
Sandberg MA
Weigel-DiFranco C
Moser A
Brockhurst RJ
Hayes KC
Johnson CA
Anderson EJ
Gaudio AR
Willett WC
Schaefer EJ
Journal: 
Arch Ophthalmol
PubMed ID: 
15364708
Pagination: 
1297-305
Volume: 
122
Issue: 
9
Abstract: 
To determine whether a therapeutic dose of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 fatty acid, will slow the course of retinal degeneration in adult patients with retinitis pigmentosa who are also receiving vitamin A.Randomized, controlled, double-masked trial of 221 patients, aged 18 to 55 years, evaluated over a 4-year interval. Patients were given either 1200 mg/d of docosahexaenoic acid or control capsules. All were given 15 000 IU/d of vitamin A (given as retinyl palmitate). Randomization considered genetic type and baseline dietary omega-3 fatty acid intake.The primary outcome measure was the total point score for the 30-2 program of the Humphrey field analyzer; secondary outcome measures were the total point score for the 30-2 and 30/60-1 programs combined, 30-Hz electroretinogram amplitude, and Early Treatment Diabetic Rentinopathy Study visual acuity.No significant differences in decline in ocular function were found between the docosahexaenoic acid plus vitamin A (DHA + A) group and control plus vitamin A (control + A) group over a 4-year interval among all 221 randomized patients or among the 208 patients who completed all 4 follow-up visits. The mean annual rate of loss of sensitivity for the Humphrey Field Analyzer 30-2 program was 37 dB for the DHA + A group and 38 dB for the control + A group (P =.88). For the Humphrey Field Analyzer 30-2 and 30/60-1 programs combined, the mean annual rates of loss of field sensitivity were 57 dB for the DHA + A group and 60 dB (P =.73) for control + A group. No toxic adverse effects were observed. No significant differences by treatment group assignment were observed within genetic types or within the category of baseline omega-3 fatty acid intake.In patients assigned to receive 15 000 IU/d of vitamin A, this randomized trial showed that 1200 mg/d of docosahexaenoic acid supplementation over a 4-year interval did not, on average, slow the course of disease in patients with retinitis pigmentosa.
Published Date: 
September, 2004

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