Health related quality of life in adolescents with abnormal bladder function: an assessment using the Child Health and Illness Profile-Adolescent Edition.

Mark McIntosh,'s picture
PubMed URL: 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18721969
Author: 
Gearhart JP
Author List: 
Dodson JL
Furth SL
Hsiao CJ
Diener-West M
Levey EB
Wu AW
Gearhart JP
Journal: 
J Urol
PubMed ID: 
18721969
Pagination: 
1846-51; discussion 1851
Volume: 
180
Issue: 
4 Suppl
Abstract: 
We studied the impact of abnormal bladder function due to congenital urological disorders on health related quality of life in children. A reliable patient based method is needed to assess the impact of these conditions in children and the interventions used to treat them.Participants 11 to 17 years old with bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex, spina bifida or other causes of abnormal bladder function self-administered the Child Health and Illness Profile-Adolescent Edition, a generic health related quality of life instrument. They also responded to questions about incontinence, catheterization status and bother level. Mean scores on the profile were compared to population based norms.Mean age of the 50 participants was 14.9 years, 62% were male and 82% were white. Diagnoses included bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex in 37 patients, spina bifida in 10 and other in 3. The mean +/- SD score on the disorders domain of 14.2 +/- 6.3 was significantly worse than the population norm of 20. Mean scores on the satisfaction, discomfort, resilience, risks and achievement domains were comparable to or better than the population based norm of 20. A total of 29 participants reported incontinence and 31 performed catheterization.In this study of adolescents with congenital causes of abnormal bladder function Child Health and Illness Profile-Adolescent Edition generic health related quality of life scores were significantly worse in the disorders domain but largely comparable to or better than those of the general population in other domains. This suggests that the profile may discern between adolescents with structural urological disease and norms but it may not be sensitive enough to fully detect the impact of the condition. Alternatively adolescents may adapt well to the challenges of urological disease.
Published Date: 
October, 2008

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