Neural stem cells reduce brain injury after unilateral carotid ligation.

Mark McIntosh,'s picture
PubMed URL: 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18206788
Author: 
Johnston MV
Author List: 
Comi AM
Cho E
Mulholland JD
Hooper A
Li Q
Qu Y
Gary DS
McDonald JW
Johnston MV
Journal: 
Pediatr Neurol
PubMed ID: 
18206788
Pagination: 
86-92
Volume: 
38
Issue: 
2
Abstract: 
Neonatal stroke presents with seizures and results in neurologic morbidity, including epilepsy, hemiparesis, and cognitive deficits. Stem cell-based therapy offers a possible therapeutic strategy for neonatal stroke. We developed an immature mouse model of stroke with acute seizures and ischemic brain injury. Postnatal day 12 CD1 mice received right-sided carotid ligation. Two or 7 days after ligation, mice received an intrastriatal injection of B5 embryonic stem cell-derived neural stem cells. Four weeks after ligation, hemispheric brain atrophy was measured. Pups receiving stem cells 2 days after ligation had less severe hemispheric brain atrophy compared with either noninjected or vehicle-injected ligated controls. Transplanted cells survived, but 3 out of 10 pups injected with stem cells developed local tumors. No difference in hemispheric brain atrophy was seen in mice injected with stem cells 7 days after ligation. Neural stem cells have the potential to ameliorate ischemic injury in the immature brain, although tumor development is a serious concern.
Published Date: 
February, 2008

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