Motor signs distinguish children with high functioning autism and Asperger's syndrome from controls.

Mark McIntosh,'s picture
PubMed URL: 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16609826
Author: 
Mostofsky SH
Author List: 
Jansiewicz EM
Goldberg MC
Newschaffer CJ
Denckla MB
Landa R
Mostofsky SH
Journal: 
J Autism Dev Disord
PubMed ID: 
16609826
Pagination: 
613-21
Volume: 
36
Issue: 
5
Abstract: 
While many studies of motor control in autism have focused on specific motor signs, there has been a lack of research examining the complete range of subtle neuromotor signs. This study compared performance on a neurologic examination standardized for children (PANESS, Physical and Neurological Exam for Subtle Signs, Denckla [1974 Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 16(6), 729-741]) between a group of 40 boys aged 6-17 with autism and average range IQs and a group of 55 typically developing boys. The Autism group was shown to have significant impairment on several measures of motor control compared to the Control group. Regression analyses revealed that a model including four PANESS variables offered a high level of discrimination in distinguishing boys with high-functioning autism from controls.
Published Date: 
July, 2006

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