Self-Injurious Behavior

The Comeback Kid

by Abigail
Green
November 13, 2013
The Neurobehavioral Unit at Kennedy Krieger helps turn around a young boy with self-injurious and aggressive behavior.

Luke McNair happyChrissy McNair describes her son Luke, 13, as “one of the happiest kids I’ve ever met.” He usually wakes up in a good mood and likes cracking jokes with his two brothers. He loves Top-40 music and animals, and has been riding horses since he was 3 years old. “The best word for him is passionate,” says his mother.

Living Through the Pain: Overcoming Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

It was a twisted ankle that finally brought Corinne down. After so many injuries-a broken hip, surgery on her knees and her shoulder-it was one small twist, something anyone would dismiss offhand, and Corinne was flat on her back, in absolutely unimaginable, intolerable pain.

Media Invasion!

Martie
Callaghan
Protecting Our Children From a Sly Intruder

Media Invasion!Today's parents have a mind-boggling array of movies, video games, CDs, and MP3s to sift through to keep abreast of their children's vast entertainment options.

Winning The Weight Loss Battle

Courtney
McGrath
Strict Diet and Discipline Helps Teen Lose More Than 200 lbs.

Ashley Melvin had a blast this summer swimming at camp, walking her dog in her Eastern Shore hometown, celebrating her Sweet Sixteen at a bowling alley.

What a difference a year makes. In August 2002, paramedics rushed to Ashley's house when she fell and her frightened grandparents realized they couldn't help her get up. At 397 lbs, Ashley was dangerously overweight. The teen depended on oxygen 24 hours a day and her feet had swollen so large she could not wear shoes.

Hope for Hillary

Father's Memoir of His Daughters Courageous Journey

Hillary with Maureen van StoneAt nine years old, Hillary Reston developed a dangerous energy her father describes as "positively thermonuclear." If they turned their back on her for an instant, her parents often found Hillary perched on top of kitchen cabinets, swallowing staples and tacks, smashing glass tables and throwing knives.

Roots of A Dangerous Habit

Courtney
McGrath
New Study Investigates the Earliest Signs of Self-Injury in Children

Roots of a Dangerous HabitYoung children go through all sorts of phases, some of which can be alarming for parents. Tantrums, defiance, refusing to eat all can cause a great deal of stress. With time and patience, most of these habits fade quickly. A more disturbing problem for many families is self-injurious behavior like head banging, skin scratching or eye poking.

Research Briefs: Current Research Studies

Does Your Child Try to Hurt Him or Herself?

Some children bang their heads, hit themselves, pull their hair, or do other things that look like they are trying to hurt themselves. Usually these behaviors go away, but they could be a sign of a serious behavior disorder known as self-injury. Kennedy Krieger researchers are conducting a study to learn why these behaviors continue for some children and go away for others. They wish to develop prevention and early intervention programs to limit self-injury.

Healing from Trauma

Tania Edgehill
Baker
The Family Center's Clinical Initiatives Help Children Recover from Trauma

Healing from TraumaEach year, more than 900,000 children in the United States experience physical or sexual abuse, community or domestic violence, neglect or abandonment. Many of these traumatic incidents occur within the caregiving system that is supposed to protect children.

Kennedy Krieger Receives $2 Million to Establish Lawless Family Endowed Chair

April 15, 2010
Michael Cataldo, Ph.D. Honored as First Recipient

Kennedy Krieger Institute announced today that Robert J. Lawless, former chairman, president and chief executive of McCormick & Company, Inc., has pledged $2 million for an endowed chair to enhance the Institute's longstanding history of helping children with special needs.

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