Neurological Disorders

7th Annual Neuropsychology Research Forum - The 2013 Lynn Speedie Lectureship

Apr 1 2013 - 3:30pm - 5:30pm

Outpatient Clinical Building
Kennedy Krieger Institute
801 North Broadway, Room 202
Baltimore, MD

About The Event:

Kennedy Krieger Institute is proud to present the 2013 Lynn Speedie Lectureship in conjunction with the 7th Annual Neuropsychology Research Forum. Dr. Maureen Dennis, PhD will present the keynote address for the forum followed by a poster session.

Keynote Address: “Plasticity, Homeostasis and Age in Childhood Brain Disorders”

3:30pm - Keynote Address

ERP and EEG Mini Boot Camp

Sep 14 2012 - 9:00am - Sep 16 2012 - 5:00pm

Led by Steve Luck, Center for Mind and Brain, UC-Davis

and Local EEG Researchers

Topic:

We are offering a 3-day session on the research use of EEG intended for beginning and intermediate EEG researchers at the graduate, postdoctoral, and faculty levels. Investigators in the fields of psychology (clinical and experimental), neuroscience, cognitive science, clinical neurology, clinical psychiatry, biomedical engineering and biophysics may be interested.

Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Shown to Impact Walking Patterns

June 1, 2012
Kennedy Krieger researchers believe tool has potential to help patients relearn to walk after brain injury

Baltimore, MD -- In a step towards improving rehabilitation for patients with walking impairments, researchers from the Kennedy Krieger Institute found that non-invasive stimulation of the cerebellum, an area of the brain known to be essential in adaptive learning, helped healthy individuals learn a new walking pattern more rapidly. The findings suggest that cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may be a valuable therapy tool to aid people relearning how to walk following a stroke or other brain injury.

Never Say Never: Kennedy Krieger Gives Hope, Not Limits, to a Family from Nebraska

Never Say NeverIt was spring of 2007, and the town of Hastings, Nebraska, was looking forward to summer. Memorial Day weekend had come and gone, and Kirk and Jami Ortegren had just watched their son Jack crawl for the first time.

Institute's Chief Medical Officer Honored

Dr. Michael V. Johnston, executive vice president and chief medical officer of the Kennedy Krieger Institute, was recently honored with the Bernard Sachs Award for his critical research. This award, presented by the Child Neurology Society, is granted to someone of international status who has done leading research in neuroscience with relevance to the care of children with neurological disorders.

The Next Generation

Courtney
McGrath
Each Year, Hundreds of Professionals Come to Kennedy Krieger for Invaluable Training

Professional Training at Kennedy KriegerWhen today's Kennedy Krieger Institute first opened its doors in 1967, its leaders were expected to continue and improve the state-of-the-art treatment services already available to children with cerebral palsy at the Children's Rehabilitation Institute, the original facility that became Kennedy Krieger, and to extend those services to children with a variety of other neurodevelopment

Dr. Arnold Capute, 'Father' of Developmental Pediatrics, Dies at Age 80

December 2, 2003
Capute's contributions to the field of developmental pediatrics are immeasurable

Baltimore- Dr. Arnold J. Capute, a faculty member at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine for nearly forty years, died November 30 at age 80 from congestive heart failure. Dr. Capute devoted the majority of his career to increasing pediatricians' understanding of neurodevelopmental disabilities, and was instrumental in the creation of the field of Developmental Pediatrics, now called Neurodevelopmental Disabilities.

Innovative New Imaging Technique "Maps" Brain Injury

September 10, 2002
Technology is leading to discoveries about how disorders of the developing brain lead to Cerebral Palsy

BALTIMORE - Physicians at Kennedy Krieger Institute and neuro-imaging experts at the Institute's F.M. Kirby Research Center for Functional Brain Imaging have developed a new way to see the white matter pathways, or "cables," that carry messages from one part of the brain to another in children with cerebral palsy. Already, the new technique has led to a better understanding of how disorders of the developing brain lead to cerebral palsy - which holds promise for better diagnosis and more effective treatment.

Neurological Disorders

To find patient care programs and faculty treating neurological disorders at Kennedy Krieger Institute, please see the right-hand column below. Additional helpful information, including definitions, symptoms, Institute press releases, Potential magazine articles, and other resources outside the Institute, have also been provided for readers on this page.

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