Stories of Potential

Transitioning into the Great Unknown: Adulthood

August 2, 2013
Navigating the path to adulthood can be at turns frustrating, overwhelming, and rewarding.

By: Allison Eatough and Kristina Rolfes

Unbroken

by Kristina
Rolfes
August 2, 2013
For Pfeiffer’s family, every little milestone is a miracle, thanks to the International Center for Spinal Cord Injury.

Pfeiffer WhiteleyAt 4 years old, Victoria “Pfeiffer” Whiteley is funny, precocious, very charming, and wise beyond her years. She loves dresses with flowers, Barbies, and all things girly. She is also partially paralyzed, a result of transverse myelitis.

The World in His Arms

by Kristina
Rolfes
August 2, 2013
For a 14-year-old boy who lost his arms in a landmine explosion in Yemen, new prosthetic arms and rehabilitative therapy from Kennedy Krieger’s Limb Differences Clinic open up a world of possibilities for his future.

Mohammed KarimFour years ago, Abdul Karim heard an explosion just outside his house in Yemen. When he opened his door, his ten-year-old son, Mohammed, was standing in the doorway, covered in blood. Mohammed had spent that morning playing outside near his village. As the sun cast its light over the nearby mosque, Mohammed noticed a shiny object on the ground.

In My Own Words: Bob Nobles III

by Abigail
Green
August 2, 2013
A student at Kennedy Krieger has his sights set on the Naval Academy.

Bob Nobles III is a student at Kennedy Krieger School Programs: Greenspring Campus. He has a diagnosis of Asperger syndrome.

Why Wait and See?

Matthew Lemon

After early intervention helped her son Matthew, Marlo Lemon teamed up with Kennedy Krieger’s Center for Autism for minority outreach.

In My Own Words: John Manison

November 2, 2012
“You can do whatever you want as long as you put your mind to it.”

John Manison is an 18-year-old freshman at Ashland University in Ohio. He is dedicated to his rehabilitation at Kennedy Krieger’s International Center for Spinal Cord Injury and focused on achieving therapy goals en route to living his life without a wheelchair.

Bringing it all Home for Patients with Tuberous Sclerosis

by Kristina
Rolfes
November 2, 2012
New interdisciplinary clinic brings world-class research, care, and support for families of patients with complex neurodevelopmental disorder.

When Chris and Crystal Ditch delivered their baby boy, Mason, they burst into tears of joy. It had taken them four years to get pregnant, and they finally held the baby they had awaited for so long. But two hours before Crystal and Mason were scheduled to be discharged, doctors told them that Mason had tumors in his tiny heart.

Bringing Back Matthew

by Kristina
Rolfes
November 2, 2012
After surviving a horrific car crash, Matthew Slattery defied expectations in his recovery from traumatic brain injury.

In an instant, the Slattery family was shattered.

Susan Slattery and her two sons, Matthew and Peter, were on their way home from visiting family in Ohio on a sunny August day in 2010 when tragedy struck. A truck driver fell asleep at the wheel, barreling into Susan Slattery’s car and pushing it under a tractor trailer, killing her and critically injuring 12-year-old Matthew and 16-year-old Peter. Peter fractured his pelvis and eye socket, while Matthew suffered a severe traumatic brain injury, losing 80 percent of his blood.

More Than Just Fun and Games

by Lauren
Glenn Manfuso
November 2, 2012
The unlikely role of video games in neurorehabilitation.

Tell a kid to do three repetitions of 15 pushups or 25 leg lifts or any of the other myriad exercises that physical therapists assign during a regular session, and the automatic response might be a roll of the eyes and a groan before relenting—only to tucker out and lose focus or motivation before it’s over.

Getting Her Voice... Again

by Suzanne
Prestwich, MD
November 2, 2012

Many of the children admitted to the inpatient rehabilitation unit at Kennedy Krieger have experienced a trauma or illness that resulted in needing a procedure called a tracheostomy. The procedure involves placing a tube in a patient’s neck to help with breathing, but the downside is that it robs the patient of the ability to speak.

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