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Hands that Heal

Courtney
McGrath
Researchers at Kennedy Krieger Investigate Whether Energy Therapy Can Benefit Children with Developmental Disabilities

To an outsider, it looks like the small boy is having fun with a baby-sitter. As he moves from toy to toy, his "sitter" follows him, occasionally placing her hands on his arms and legs. She tries to touch his head, but he pushes her hand away. She spends a lot of time pressing lightly on his chest. When he gets tired, she keeps applying light pressure as he becomes more and more relaxed. As the boy starts to nod off, she steps back, ending the session.

Working at Play

Holly Lewis
Maddox
A Child's Work Is to Play, But Not All Children Know How. Several Programs at Kennedy Krieger Teach Them -- For the Sake of More Than Just Amusement.

Corey Opher, Jr.The playroom of Kennedy Krieger Institute's Achievements program doesn't look like a typical child's playroom. There are no blocks, books, dolls or trucks lining the shelves or scattered about the floor. In fact, the room seems practically devoid of toys, those things that inspire the imaginations of children but it's not.

Something to Talk About

Courtney
McGrath
Early Interventions Can Bring Out the Chatterbox in Children

Madelyn Dennis with Her TherapistFew experiences thrill a parent more than the first time they hear their child say "mama" or "dada." Those words, often a baby's first, are usually followed by a flurry of new ones, and eventually phrases, thoughts, questions and observations that give parents constantly new glimpses of the unique person their child is becoming.

Alcohol Anonymous

Courtney
McGrath

Simmons Girls and Their Mom with DoctorLike all siblings, the six Simmons girls are unique in almost every way. Adopted in early childhood by Betty Simmons of Baltimore and her late husband Gregory, they have their individual interests, temperaments and strengths. But they also share much in common, in particular some serious cognitive, and possibly behavioral, issues that may be the result of prenatal alcohol exposure.

Protecting Fragile Innocence

Courtney
Jolley
Intensive inpatient program helps children and families dealing with severe behavioral problems

Brandon CalvertThe moment someone becomes a parent, he or she accepts the tremendous responsibility of doing everything possible to ensure their child's health, happiness and ability to thrive to create a safe place where they can learn and grow in peace, enjoying the simple innocence of childhood.

The Will to Walk

Courtney
Jolley
Spinal cord injury: innovative therapies lead to remarkable results

Loretta McRaeAs she typed the words into the Internet search engine, Loretta McRae knew it was a long shot. In the months since the 15-year-old struck her head on an ocean sandbar in Australia, sustaining a C6 level spinal cord injury, virtually every expert said she'd already gotten her miracle. She was alive, she could wiggle her toes, she was regaining sensation in her limbs.

Building Stronger Bones

Courtney
Jolley
Osteogenesis Imperfecta Clinic extends services to children with a variety of conditions

Logan Insley with Dr. ShapiroLoss of bone density is a concern commonly associated with the elderly, for whom a simple stumble can easily result in a painful, debilitating fracture. But a variety of other conditions can make low bone density a lifetime challenge, one best addressed as early as possible.

Treating ADHD

Kennedy Krieger's Center for Development and Learning Helps Children with ADHD Lead Fuller Lives

Kerrel Williams with Pediatric Nurse PractitionerEach year, Kennedy Krieger Institute's Center for Development and Learning evaluates and treats several thousand children with ADHD. The evaluation includes a detailed medical, developmental and behavioral history of the child.

Attitude Adjustment

Courtney
McGrath
Tantrums, Biting, Crying -- Every Parent Struggles with Them from Time to Time, But When Misbehavior Intensifies, It Can Traumatize the Entire Family.

Sixteen-year-old Travis Smith can't wait to try out for his Baltimore City high school's football team next fall. He's a lot like most boys his age: non-stop energy. Today, that energy is channeled positively, a big change from when he first started school. Back then, his mother Natasha Lewis was at her wits end, receiving phone calls practically on a daily basis telling her to come pick him up from school. The reasons varied: Travis had hit another child. Travis had lashed out at a teacher or an aide. Travis was threatening to jump from the roof of the school.

Reversing Paralysis

Courtney
McGrath
Led by World-Renowned Researcher Dr. John McDonald, A New Center at Kennedy Krieger Revolutionizes Care for Children with Spinal Cord Injuries and Paralysis through Activity-Based Therapy.

Reversing ParalysisFor years, people who suffered spinal cord injuries were told that the first six months of their recovery would paint an accurate picture of how they would live the rest of their lives. If a patient recovered any movement, it would probably be in those first few months and, nearly all experts believed, improvement after two years was impossible.

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