Autism Spectrum Disorders

Autographs

November 12, 2013
Special education teacher Katie Cascio is inspired by a student who comes into his own at Kennedy Krieger High School.

DeVant Capers with his teacher, Katie CascioI was lucky enough to meet DeVante—a shy, reserved student with autism spectrum disorder—during my first year as an assistant teacher at

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  • US News & World Report: A Third of Autistic Children Also Have ADHD

    June 5, 2013
    Kennedy Krieger research shows that nearly one-third of children with autism also have ADHD.

    About a third of children who have autism also have symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to a study released Wednesday. According to researchers at the Baltimore-based Kennedy Krieger Institute, which studies autism, the two disorders may be somehow linked. 
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    NBC4: Autism Screenings for Infants

    May 29, 2013
    A television segment spotlights our Center for Autism’s initiative to provide free developmental assessments to baby siblings most at risk of developing autism.

    If you have a child with an autism spectrum disorder, there's a 1 in 5 chance that your child's younger sibling will also have one. Now some doctors are offering free screenings for infant siblings in hopes that those who need treatment will get it sooner.
    Watch online

    ABC7: Protect Our Children

    April 6, 2013
    Dr. Paul Law discusses our Interactive Autism Network’s research findings on children with autism who wander from safe places.

    Dr. Paul Law, co-author of a recent study by the Kennedy Krieger Institute, speaks to a phenomenon known as wandering. Alison Singer, Co-Founder & President of the Autism Science Foundation describes her own experiences with her 15 year old daughter and how more than 49% of autistic children have been put at risk by this behavior.
    Watch online.

    ROAR Lecture: The Evolving Role of Technology in the Lives of Children with Autism

    Oct 10 2013 - 11:30am - 12:30pm

    Kennedy Krieger Institute
    3901 Greenspring Avenue
    Creamer Building
    Third Floor, Large Conference Room
    Baltimore, MD 21211

    ABOUT THE EVENT:

    Dr. Shic will discuss the following:

    STAR Training: What is Transition Planning for a Teen with an ASD Diagnosis?

    Sep 16 2013 - 1:00pm - 2:30pm

    Kennedy Krieger Institute
    3901 Greenspring Avenue
    Creamer Building
    Third Floor, Large Conference Room
    Baltimore, MD 21211

    ABOUT THE EVENT:

    This presentation is for parents who have teens with ASD who are planning for a transition from school to college, employment, and/or community. Transition planning can be confusing and here is an opportunity to learn about the process. Resources will be shared.

    Presenter: Catherine (Cathy) G. Groschan, LCSW-C

    STAR Training: Getting an Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis: Where do I go from here?

    Sep 16 2013 - 9:30am - 11:00am

    Kennedy Krieger Institute
    3901 Greenspring Avenue
    Creamer Building
    Third Floor, Large Conference Room
    Baltimore, MD 21211

    ABOUT THE EVENT:

    Cathy Groshan will present in-depth information about autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and discuss resources available in Maryland.  Questions from the audience are welcomed. After the presentation, the speaker will provide handouts that offer guidance related to getting a diagnosis, finding services, the education system and more.

    Transition Success Story: James Williams III

    by Kristina
    Rolfes
    August 2, 2013
    James is redefining his potential thanks to more than 15 years of services at Kennedy Krieger, and parents who actively sought out vocational, employment, and social opportunities in the community.

    James Williams IIIDoctors once told James Williams’s parents their son should be institutionalized due to his severe intellectual disability and autism. Now 22, James is employed and has an active social life.

    Transitioning into the Great Unknown: Adulthood

    August 2, 2013
    Navigating the path to adulthood can be at turns frustrating, overwhelming, and rewarding.

    By: Allison Eatough and Kristina Rolfes

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