Institute Publications

Standing Firmly on Two Feet

Julie
Lincoln
Boy Undergoes Dramatic Surgery, Therapy to Lengthen Short Limb

Tyler KiskisAt 5 years old, Tyler Kiskis is a bundle of energy, a little spark-plug with tossled brown hair and an impish grin who revels in the things that most 5-year-old boys do baseball and soccer, chasing the family Labrador, jumping through a water sprinkler in the front yard of his family's Pasadena home.

Making the Grade

Courtney
McGrath
Kennedy Krieger Clinic Evaluates College-Aged Students with Learning Disorders

As soon as Joshua Fine reached pre-school, his mother Kathleen noticed that he learned differently from his older brother. As he picked up his ABCs and began trying to piece words together, Josh often reversed the order of his letters. This tendency continued as Josh began elementary school, but never reached a crisis point. Although Josh frequently refused to read, his grades stayed adequate. But Kathleen harbored nagging suspicions that her son wasn't reaching his full academic potential.

Hands that Heal

Courtney
McGrath
Researchers at Kennedy Krieger Investigate Whether Energy Therapy Can Benefit Children with Developmental Disabilities

To an outsider, it looks like the small boy is having fun with a baby-sitter. As he moves from toy to toy, his "sitter" follows him, occasionally placing her hands on his arms and legs. She tries to touch his head, but he pushes her hand away. She spends a lot of time pressing lightly on his chest. When he gets tired, she keeps applying light pressure as he becomes more and more relaxed. As the boy starts to nod off, she steps back, ending the session.

Research Frontiers: Trials of the Mind

Holly Lewis
Maddux
Kennedy Krieger Researchers Hope That Advancements in Alzheimer's Disease Will Address Early Memory Loss and Other Symptoms in Individuals with Down Syndrome

PrescriptionResearchers at Kennedy Krieger Institute are investigating two experimental treatments that it is hoped will slow or stop the progress of Alzheimer's disease in people with Down syndrome.

Working at Play

Holly Lewis
Maddox
A Child's Work Is to Play, But Not All Children Know How. Several Programs at Kennedy Krieger Teach Them -- For the Sake of More Than Just Amusement.

Corey Opher, Jr.The playroom of Kennedy Krieger Institute's Achievements program doesn't look like a typical child's playroom. There are no blocks, books, dolls or trucks lining the shelves or scattered about the floor. In fact, the room seems practically devoid of toys, those things that inspire the imaginations of children but it's not.

NIH Funds New National Study Center for Study of Autism

Julie
Lincoln
Kennedy Krieger Institute Designated As One of Eight Comprehensive Research Centers in Country

Dr. Rebecca LandaIn a major announcement, the National Institutes of Health has awarded Kennedy Krieger Institute a five-year, $7.7 million grant to become a national center devoted to autism research, focusing on neurobiologic origins of autism, as well as early detection and intervention.

President's Message

Gary W. Goldstein, MDSpring is a time for growth and maturity. With love, patience and ample nurturing, children with special needs can fulfill their possibility. At Kennedy Krieger Institute, the seeds for success are planted all year around, so that children may bloom into self-assured, self-loving individuals.

Q&A: Ask the Expert

In order to address our readers' interests and needs more directly, Touch magazine is launching an "Ask the Expert" column. If you have a question about a pediatric developmental disorder, send it to us via e-mail at asktheexpert@kennedykrieger.org. Touch editors will direct your questions to the Kennedy Krieger clinicians who specialize in those fields. We'll begin printing your questions and their answers in the Spring 2004 issue of Touch. We look forward to hearing from you.

News Briefs

Dr. Arnold Capute, Father' of Developmental Pediatrics, Dies at Age 80

Dr. Arnold J. Capute, a faculty member at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine for nearly forty years, died Nov. 30 at age 80. Dr. Capute devoted most of his career to increasing pediatricians' understanding of neurodevelopmental disabilities, and was instrumental in the creation of the field of Developmental Pediatrics, now called Neurodevelopmental Disabilities.

Something to Talk About

Courtney
McGrath
Early Interventions Can Bring Out the Chatterbox in Children

Madelyn Dennis with Her TherapistFew experiences thrill a parent more than the first time they hear their child say "mama" or "dada." Those words, often a baby's first, are usually followed by a flurry of new ones, and eventually phrases, thoughts, questions and observations that give parents constantly new glimpses of the unique person their child is becoming.

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