Institute Publications

News Briefs

2006 Constellation Energy Classic fourth annual event benefits Kennedy Krieger Institute

The 2006 Constellation Energy Classic (CEC) ran from September 11-17 at Hayfields Country Club in Hunt Valley, Md. This year's golf tournament marked the 24th of 29 Charles Schwab Cup events on the Champions Tour. Bob Gilder stunned the crowds as he played his way to his second straight victory at the CEC. However, it was golfing legend Arnold Palmer who stole the show as he competed in stroke play for the first time in 11 months.

The Road to Discovery

Courtney
McGrath
High School Student Shines in Demanding Museum Job

Seth JacksonIt seemed like a perfect opportunity: a work-based internship at a highly regarded children's museum. Chosen students would perform administrative tasks, prepare supplies for crafts projects and, most importantly, help children and families visiting the museum make their way through a variety of exciting exhibits.

Shooting Star

Allison
Eatough
Kennedy Krieger High School student with autism secures dream internship with NASA

Abby ReznekThere's just something about the solar system that fascinates me. It started when I was about five years old. I couldn't get enough of books and computer programs about planets, moons, and stars. I was even interested in model rockets because, in life-size form, they created a path to the great Milky Way.

Research Frontiers: Piecing Together the Mystery of Autism

Courtney
Jolley
Kennedy Krieger takes a multifaceted approach to investigating this complex disorder

The Maloni BoysMore than 25,000 children will be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders this year a number greater than AIDS, diabetes, and cancer combined yet so many aspects of the disorder remain a mystery. Is its cause genetic, environmental, or some combination of factors? Are dietary changes and drugs the best hope for treatment, or should the focus remain solely on behavioral interventions?

Appetite for Life

Courtney
Jolley
January 30, 2006
Kennedy Krieger's intensive inpatient program helps children battle severe feeding disorders

Thomas MoxleyMealtimes can be a source of tension for many families with young children. From cajoling finicky eaters to eat their broccoli to battling restless youngsters who simply refuse to sit at the table and finish their dinner, parents can face an uphill battle when it comes to feeding their children balanced meals every day.

Finding Her Voice

Allison
Eatough
February 1, 2006
Assistive Technology Clinic Enhances Communication for Those in Need

Maggie PietMost 18-year-old girls love to talk. Maggie Piet is no exception. She just uses modern technology to do so.

Research Frontiers: Beyond the ABCs

Annie
Iles
NIH-funded study examines causes of poor reading comprehension

Morgan and Michael GreeneLearning to read can be a long and difficult process. The promise of first reading single words, then sentences, and then entire books waits like a light at the end of the tunnel. For a child with poor reading comprehension, however, the light never comes. Sentences are meaningless as the young reader struggles to understand the connection between different words.

I Can Skate

Meredith
Purvis
April 1, 2010
Dorothy Hamill's adaptive skating program gives children with physical disabilities a chance to soar

Dorothy HamillThe lobby of the ice rink hums with excitement as children laugh and talk while their parents bundle them up and help them get their skates on. In one corner, a little boy grins from ear to ear as his dad helps him to his feet and his mom snaps photo after photo. Across the room, another mom keeps a careful eye on her son as he practices walking in his skates, one hand on the wall for stability.

ROAR Breaks Record and the Silence Surrounding Autism

Spirits were once again high at this year's ROAR for Autism event. On Sunday, April 25, at Oregon Ridge Park in Cockeysville, Maryland, an enthusiastic group of more than 1,000 participants were on hand for ROAR for Autism's sixth annual bike ride, nature walk, and family fun festival. The event raises critically needed funds for autism research and programs at the Institute and serves as a way to recognize Autism Awareness Month.

Living on the Brightside

Laura
Laing
Kennedy Krieger and Circle of Friends are an important reason I have such a full life.

Living on the BrightsideEvery month, I meet my best friends for dinner where we get to catch up with each other. Then we go to Circle of Friends, a part of Kennedy Krieger's Brightside mentoring program, where we learn about friendship and how to socialize with other people. I am 25 years old, and I have Down syndrome, which means that I was born with 22 chromosomes instead of 21.

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