Research Frontiers

Research Frontiers: The Study of Epigenetics

Martie
Callaghan

Are your genes turned on?

When scientists began The Human Genome Project in the early 1990s, their hope was to discover and interpret the entire blueprint for life, to decode not only how the human body is put together, but also to find the genetic cause and cure for every disease. Imagine their surprise when they discovered not the anticipated 100,000 genes, but rather 20,000 genes making up the human genome-about the same as that of fish and mice, and less than many plants!

Research Frontiers: Back in Stride -- Innovative Treadmill Study Helps Restore Walk Patterns

Martie
Callaghan

Motion Analysis LaboratoryYou're waiting at the airport for your best friend to arrive. It's been several years since you last saw each other. A figure emerges from the throng of travelers, and as he walks quickly toward you, you recognize your friend right away by his long, loping stride. The way he walks, or his gait, is a very complex characteristic that, like a fingerprint, is unique to every person.

Short Circuits

Tania R.
Edghill
January 31, 2006
Kennedy Krieger Researcher Uses Innovations in MRI Technology to Study the Brain's Structure and Function in Search of the Cause of ADHD

Erin Blitz with Dr. Stewart MostofskyLaurie Blitz began to suspect that something was not quite right with her daughter as early as when she was a toddler. Erin seemed overly hyperactive, moving so much that even simple tasks like changing her diaper became lessons in patience and control. When she was old enough to walk, she would constantly run away, placing herself in danger.

Research Frontiers: Greater Than the Sum

Kennedy Krieger Researcher Studies the Underlying Causes of Math Learning Disability in School-Age Children

Dr. Michele MazzoccoAsk a young child what the toughest subject is in school, and he is likely to say math or reading. While there have been thousands of studies on reading disabilities and, consequently, methods developed for overcoming them there have been far fewer on math dysfunction. Michèle M. M.

Flying High on Life

Tania R.
Edghill
Kennedy Krieger Researcher Helps Implement Substance Abuse Prevention Programs Targeting Preschoolers in Baltimore

Peggy McNally at Dayspring Early Head Start CenterEvery morning, 3-year-old La'Nell Alewine and her 4-year-old sister, Ja'Nell, get dressed and make their way to preschool at the Dayspring Head Start Center in East Baltimore. There, the girls eat a healthy breakfast, play with their classmates and learn about the alphabet, colors and numbers.

Research Frontiers: Combatting Cancer

Courtney
McGrath
Researcher Moves One Step Closer to Revolutionizing Treatment of Pediatric Brain Tumors

The past 30 years have seen remarkable improvements in the treatment of childhood cancers. Children diagnosed with leukemia and other diseases once considered death sentences now typically survive at least five years. But brain cancer remains an ominous threat killing nearly 40% of children within five years of diagnosis, and leaving many survivors with permanent cognitive deficits as a result of surgeries and radiation therapies.

The Gender Gap

Courtney
McGrath
Kennedy Krieger Scientists Probe How ADHD Affects Girls Differently Than Boys

While ADHD is thought to occur more often in boys than in girls, there may be another reason why four times as many boys are diagnosed with the disorder. Girls with ADHD tend to demonstrate more subtle symptoms, although little research has been done to explain why. A newly launched Kennedy Krieger study aims to determine whether ADHD is associated with different brain characteristics in girls than in boys.

Targeting Tumors

Courtney
McGrath
Research and Care Programs at Kennedy Krieger Work to Minimize the Damage Caused by Brain Cancer

Nicole BahenIf you've ever doubted how quickly your life can be turned upside down, just ask the Bahen family. On Monday, Nov. 14, 2000, the Bahens' 5-year-old daughter Nicole joined her friends for her usual afternoon dance class. By Sunday Nov. 20, Nicole lay in intensive care recovering from surgery, unable to speak, roll over or swallow, nearly paralyzed on her right side. Such is the swift devastation of a pediatric brain tumor.

Research Frontiers: Unlocking the Fragile X Mystery

Courtney
McGrath
Kennedy Krieger Scientists Explore Syndrome's Effect on Neural Proteins

Kennedy Krieger recently received a major grant from the National Institutes of Health to further investigate Fragile X syndrome, the second most common cause of intellectual disability. The two-year, $300,000 grant will help a team led by Kennedy Krieger's Dr. Walter Kaufmann learn more about how the disorder manifests itself, which could make treating the symptoms of Fragile X easier.

Hands that Heal

Courtney
McGrath
Researchers at Kennedy Krieger Investigate Whether Energy Therapy Can Benefit Children with Developmental Disabilities

To an outsider, it looks like the small boy is having fun with a baby-sitter. As he moves from toy to toy, his "sitter" follows him, occasionally placing her hands on his arms and legs. She tries to touch his head, but he pushes her hand away. She spends a lot of time pressing lightly on his chest. When he gets tired, she keeps applying light pressure as he becomes more and more relaxed. As the boy starts to nod off, she steps back, ending the session.

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