Brain Injury

Playing It Smart

Lauren
Manfuso
June 19, 2012
The Neurorehabilitation Concussion Clinic helps young athletes figure out a game plan for recovery after a sports-related concussion.

Aidan FieldingIn October 2008, Ryne Dougherty, a 16-year-old New Jersey teenager and junior linebacker for his high school football team, was in the middle of a game when he suffered a blow to his head -- just three and a half weeks after another on-field tackle left him with a concussion. This time, he was removed from the game and sent to the hospital, where they found bleeding in his brain. He died two days later.

Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Shown to Impact Walking Patterns

June 1, 2012
Kennedy Krieger researchers believe tool has potential to help patients relearn to walk after brain injury

Baltimore, MD -- In a step towards improving rehabilitation for patients with walking impairments, researchers from the Kennedy Krieger Institute found that non-invasive stimulation of the cerebellum, an area of the brain known to be essential in adaptive learning, helped healthy individuals learn a new walking pattern more rapidly. The findings suggest that cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may be a valuable therapy tool to aid people relearning how to walk following a stroke or other brain injury.

Ben's Story

July 8, 2011
What happened next would change Ben’s life forever, and no one could possibly have seen it coming.

Ben's StoryIt was a perfect day at the beach. The sun was shining, and the water was just right. Ben and his friends splashed in the waves and built sand castles, while his mom Joanne and the other parents chatted under the umbrellas, keeping a watchful eye on the children. But as the day came to a close, everyone headed back to the house, just a few blocks away.

Girl Interrupted: The Long Road to Recovery After A Brain Injury

Girl InterruptedA faded piece of paper taped to her bathroom mirror lists the things that 20-year-old Amy Dykes needs to do each morning: take her medicine, brush her hair, wash her face, brush her teeth, apply her makeup. Today that piece of paper is seldom used, but just two years ago, it was a map that helped guide Amy through each morning.

Finding Her Voice

Allison
Eatough
February 1, 2006
Assistive Technology Clinic Enhances Communication for Those in Need

Maggie PietMost 18-year-old girls love to talk. Maggie Piet is no exception. She just uses modern technology to do so.

Cameron's Story

As 6-year-old Cameron Mott sings and dances her way around her family's North Carolina living room, it's obvious she has some serious star power. But things weren't always this way. At age three she started having seizures and was diagnosed with cortical dysplasia, an abnormality in the development of the cerebral cortex.

"She was having six to 10 seizures a day," says her dad, Casey. The seizures robbed Cameron's family of their little girl. Every morning she was clear and bright, but then the first seizure would hit. Cameron would lose consciousness and fall to the floor.

Research Frontiers: Back in Stride -- Innovative Treadmill Study Helps Restore Walk Patterns

Martie
Callaghan

Motion Analysis LaboratoryYou're waiting at the airport for your best friend to arrive. It's been several years since you last saw each other. A figure emerges from the throng of travelers, and as he walks quickly toward you, you recognize your friend right away by his long, loping stride. The way he walks, or his gait, is a very complex characteristic that, like a fingerprint, is unique to every person.

Targeting Tumors

Courtney
McGrath
Research and Care Programs at Kennedy Krieger Work to Minimize the Damage Caused by Brain Cancer

Nicole BahenIf you've ever doubted how quickly your life can be turned upside down, just ask the Bahen family. On Monday, Nov. 14, 2000, the Bahens' 5-year-old daughter Nicole joined her friends for her usual afternoon dance class. By Sunday Nov. 20, Nicole lay in intensive care recovering from surgery, unable to speak, roll over or swallow, nearly paralyzed on her right side. Such is the swift devastation of a pediatric brain tumor.

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