Spinal Cord Injury

Spinal Cord Injury Updates - Fall 2012

The Fall 2012 Newsletter of the the International Center for Spinal Cord Injury.

Related Materials and Information

In My Own Words: John Manison

November 2, 2012
“You can do whatever you want as long as you put your mind to it.”

John Manison is an 18-year-old freshman at Ashland University in Ohio. He is dedicated to his rehabilitation at Kennedy Krieger’s International Center for Spinal Cord Injury and focused on achieving therapy goals en route to living his life without a wheelchair.

Research Frontiers: Looking for an Alternative to Embryonic Stem Cells

Martie
Callaghan
Researchers hope that iPS cells may some day function as embryonic stem cells without the controversy

In 2009, the FDA approved the use of human embryonic stem cell-based therapy for the treatment of patients with spinal cord injuries. Cell-based therapy - the use of human cells transplanted into the human body to promote healing - is not a futuristic concept. Bone marrow transplant, for example, is a cell-based therapy that was proven to be safe and effective more than 50 years ago. Stem cells are particularly useful in these cell-based therapies because they are both immortal and flexible, meaning they can divide without end and they can become almost any type of cell.

Never Say Never: Kennedy Krieger Gives Hope, Not Limits, to a Family from Nebraska

Never Say NeverIt was spring of 2007, and the town of Hastings, Nebraska, was looking forward to summer. Memorial Day weekend had come and gone, and Kirk and Jami Ortegren had just watched their son Jack crawl for the first time.

Building the Future: Young Woman Turns Spinal Cord Injury into an Inspirational Career

Meredith
Purvis

There was broken glass and debris everywhere, and I could hear sirens in the distance. Just moments before I was sleeping in the car as we drove home from a family vacation in Florida. I was jolted awake as the car flipped over, and I could feel myself being thrown around as if I were in a washing machine. I was strangely calm, lying half in and half out of the backseat - until the paramedic checked me for injuries and I couldn't feel anything. I began to panic. When I asked if I was paralyzed, he wouldn't answer.

Research Frontiers: Piecing Together the Mystery of Autism

Courtney
Jolley
Kennedy Krieger takes a multifaceted approach to investigating this complex disorder

The Maloni BoysMore than 25,000 children will be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders this year a number greater than AIDS, diabetes, and cancer combined yet so many aspects of the disorder remain a mystery. Is its cause genetic, environmental, or some combination of factors? Are dietary changes and drugs the best hope for treatment, or should the focus remain solely on behavioral interventions?

The Will to Walk

Courtney
Jolley
Spinal cord injury: innovative therapies lead to remarkable results

Loretta McRaeAs she typed the words into the Internet search engine, Loretta McRae knew it was a long shot. In the months since the 15-year-old struck her head on an ocean sandbar in Australia, sustaining a C6 level spinal cord injury, virtually every expert said she'd already gotten her miracle. She was alive, she could wiggle her toes, she was regaining sensation in her limbs.

Building Stronger Bones

Courtney
Jolley
Osteogenesis Imperfecta Clinic extends services to children with a variety of conditions

Logan Insley with Dr. ShapiroLoss of bone density is a concern commonly associated with the elderly, for whom a simple stumble can easily result in a painful, debilitating fracture. But a variety of other conditions can make low bone density a lifetime challenge, one best addressed as early as possible.

Living the Possibility

Courtney
McGrath
Kennedy Krieger Spokesman Proves That Recovery Is Possible Following A Spinal Cord Injury

Patrick RummerfieldFor someone who has been paralyzed from the neck down, the idea of ever walking again, driving a car or even doing something as simple as giving a friend a hug probably seems like a distant dream.

Reversing Paralysis

Courtney
McGrath
Led by World-Renowned Researcher Dr. John McDonald, A New Center at Kennedy Krieger Revolutionizes Care for Children with Spinal Cord Injuries and Paralysis through Activity-Based Therapy.

Reversing ParalysisFor years, people who suffered spinal cord injuries were told that the first six months of their recovery would paint an accurate picture of how they would live the rest of their lives. If a patient recovered any movement, it would probably be in those first few months and, nearly all experts believed, improvement after two years was impossible.

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