Movement Disorders Program (MDP)

Discovery Shows Cerebellum Plays Important Role In Sensing Limb Position And Movement

September 4, 2013
Kennedy Krieger Institute researchers find that damage to the cerebellum impairs ability to predict motion outcomes and discrimination between limb positions.

Baltimore, Md. -- Researchers at the Kennedy Krieger Institute announced today study findings showing, for the first time, the link between the brain’s cerebellum and proprioception, or the body’s ability to sense movement and joint and limb position.

The Spectrum of Developmental Disabilities XXXV: The Continuum of Motor Dysfunction

Mar 18 2013 (All day) - Mar 20 2013 (All day)

DESCRIPTION

The Spectrum of Developmental Disabilities activity will provide an interdisciplinary approach to the issues of motor dysfunction. This multidisciplinary course will review motor dysfunction, including epidemiology, genetic and neuroimaging issues, diagnostic overlaps, associated dysfunctions, evaluation and management, outcomes and future directions.

Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Shown to Impact Walking Patterns

June 1, 2012
Kennedy Krieger researchers believe tool has potential to help patients relearn to walk after brain injury

Baltimore, MD -- In a step towards improving rehabilitation for patients with walking impairments, researchers from the Kennedy Krieger Institute found that non-invasive stimulation of the cerebellum, an area of the brain known to be essential in adaptive learning, helped healthy individuals learn a new walking pattern more rapidly. The findings suggest that cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may be a valuable therapy tool to aid people relearning how to walk following a stroke or other brain injury.

Movement Disorders Program (MDP)

Kennedy Krieger Institute • 707 North Broadway • Baltimore, MD 21205

Director:

Alexander H. Hoon Jr., MD, MPH

About Our Program:

The Movement Disorders Program (MDP) is one of three programs within the Phelps Center for Cerebral Palsy and Neurodevelopmental Medicine.

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