Maternal Child Health Careers/Research Initiatives -- Undergraduate Program

Principal Investigator: Harolyn Belcher

Sponsored by DHHS/CDC -- 1U50MN000025.

Healthy People 2020 highlights the importance of eliminating health disparities and increasing the quality and years of healthy life free of preventable disease, disability, and injury. Current scientific evidence overwhelmingly documents the disproportionately high burden of preventable disease, disability, and injury among people who are considered racial and ethnic minorities in the United States, especially African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans. Yet, there are projected shortages in the public health workforce, especially for African American, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, and select Asian American populations.

This proposal will address these projected short-falls through proposed activities to meet CDC-RFA-MN11-1101 Program Area A, that will be entitled Maternal and Child Health Careers/Research Initiatives for Student Enhancement-Undergraduate Program (MCHC/RISE-UP) and Program Area C, entitled James A. Ferguson Emerging Infectious Diseases Fellowship (Fellowship). The comprehensive activities planned for Program Areas A and C include all required activities outlined in RFA MN11-1101 and utilize the successful recruitment and training strategies developed over the last five years for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention grant, entitled "Research Initiatives for Student Enhancement" (RISE; U50/CCU325127). The overarching goal of this grant application is to create a national program to promote successful entry and completion of graduate level study and careers in public health and biomedical sciences for students from under-represented ethnic and racial populations.

This application will create a national training partnership among Kennedy Krieger Institute (KKI; Lead Agency), Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) (Coppin State University, Morgan State University, and Howard University) in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. area; the University of South Dakota (USD) in the Central Plains area; and the University of Southern California (USC)/Children's Hospital Los Angeles and their partner, California State University Los Angeles (CSU-LA), a federally designated Minority and Hispanic Serving Institution in the Los Angeles area (West Coast) to optimize the ability to recruit and support the academic and career development of talented and diverse undergraduate and graduate students in the MCHC/RISE-UP and Fellowship program. These institutions all have or are affiliated with Maternal and Child Health Bureau-funded (MCHB) Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (LEND) graduate training programs. In addition, faculty from the KKI, Morgan State University (MSU), Coppin State University (CSU), and USD are participating institutions in the 2010-2011 Diversity in MCHB Training Collaborative. The USC in collaboration with University of California-LA's MCHB-funded training program, participated in the 2009-2010 Diversity in MCHB Training Collaborative.