Treatment and prognosis of primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

TitleTreatment and prognosis of primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsRen H, Shen P, Li X, Pan X, Zhang Q, Feng X, Zhang W, Chen N
JournalContributions to nephrology
Volume181
Pagination109-18
Date Published2013
Abstract

This study aimed to analyze the treatment, clinical outcomes, and risk factors that affect the prognosis of patients with primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and to provide theoretical evidence for various treatment options in these patients. The study reviewed the clinical, laboratory, and pathological data of 168 patients with primary FSGS treated at Ruijin Hospital between January 2002 and October 2011. Of these patients, 108 were male (64.3%) and 60 were female (35.7%). The median age of disease onset was 38 years (range 12-78 years). The median case history was 10 months (range 4 days to 30 years). The mean proteinuria level was 2.3 ± 0.6 g/day. 75 (44.6%) patients had nephrotic syndrome. The mean serum creatinine was 108.1 ± 8.9 μmol/l. Over a follow-up period of 25.3 ± 11.4 months, end-stage renal failure occurred in 4 patients, and all 4 survived. In the group treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker, the following factors were identified as risk factors for experiencing a 50% increase in serum creatinine over the baseline: a baseline eGFR <60 ml/min, proteinuria >1 g/day during the follow-up period, glomerular sclerosis >grade 1, and tubulointerstitial lesions >stage 1. In the group treated with steroids, patients who achieved a stable remission had better preserved renal function and milder glomerular sclerosis than steroid-dependent patients (p < 0.01). Steroid-resistant FSGS patients had a worse histological severity of glomerular sclerosis than steroid-dependent patients (p < 0.01). The prognosis of FSGS was correlated with the amount of proteinuria, the level of serum creatinine, and the severity of glomerular sclerosis and tubulointerstitial lesions. Steroids may be more effective in those who have better preserved renal function and milder glomerular sclerosis.

DOI10.1155/2013/170532
Alternate JournalContrib Nephrol