Toxic effects of octylphenol on the expression of genes in liver identified by suppression subtractive hybridization of Rana chensinensis.

TitleToxic effects of octylphenol on the expression of genes in liver identified by suppression subtractive hybridization of Rana chensinensis.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsLi X-Y, Xiao N, Zhang Y-H
JournalEcotoxicology (London, England)
Date Published2013 Oct 25
Abstract

Octylphenol (OP) is the degradative product of alkylphenol ethoxylates that are widely used to produce rubber, pesticides, and paints. It is chemically stable substance and demonstrates estrogenic effects, toxicity and carcinogenic effects in the environment. The toxin accumulates rapidly in the liver where it exerts most of its damage, but the molecular mechanisms behind its toxicity remain unclear. Due to limited information concerning the effect of OP on liver, this study investigates how OP causes hepatotoxicity in liver. Here, suppression subtractive hybridization was used to identify the alterations in gene transcription of the frog (Rana chensinensis) after exposure to OP. After hybridization and cloning, the subtractive cDNA libraries were obtained. At random, 207 positive clones were selected and sequenced from the subtractive libraries, which gave a total of 75 gene fragment sequences. The screening identified numerous genes involved in apoptosis, signal transduction, cytoskeletal remodeling, innate immunity, material and energy metabolism, translation and transcription which were extensively discussed. Two sequenced genes were analyzed further using real time quantitative PCR. The two genes from the library were found to be transcriptionally up-regulated. These results confirmed the successful construction of the subtractive cDNA library that was enriched for the genes that were differentially transcribed in the amphibian liver challenged with OP, and for the first time present the basic data on toxicity effect of OP on liver.

DOI10.1152/ajplung.00423.2012
Alternate JournalEcotoxicology