Hypoxia-inducible haemoglobins of Daphnia pulex and their role in the response to acute and chronic temperature increase.

TitleHypoxia-inducible haemoglobins of Daphnia pulex and their role in the response to acute and chronic temperature increase.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsZeis B, Becker D, Gerke P, Koch M, Paul RJ
JournalBiochimica et biophysica acta
Volume1834
Issue9
Pagination1704-10
Date Published2013 Sep
Abstract

Daphnia pulex is challenged by severe oxygen and temperature changes in its habitat. In response to hypoxia, the equipment of oxygen transport proteins is adjusted in quantity and quality by differential expression of haemoglobin isoforms. This study focuses on the response of 20°C acclimated animals to elevated temperature using transcriptomic and proteomic approaches. Acute temperature stress (30°C) induced the hypoxia-inducible Hb isoforms most strongly, resulting in an increase of the haemoglobin mRNA pool by 70% within 8h. Long-term-acclimation to moderately elevated temperature (24°C) only evoked minor changes of the Hb mRNA suite. Nevertheless, the concentration of the hemolymph pool of haemoglobin was elevated by 80%. In this case, the constitutive Hb isoforms showed the strongest increase, with Hb01 and Hb02 contributing by 64% to the total amount of respiratory protein. The regulation patterns upon acute temperature stress likely reflect temperature-induced tissue hypoxia, whereas in case of persisting exposure to moderately elevated temperature, acclimation processes enabled the successful return to oxygen homeostasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxygen Binding and Sensing Proteins.

DOI10.1111/ans.12135
Alternate JournalBiochim. Biophys. Acta