Effect of intravenous coadministration of human stroma cell lines on engraftment of long-term repopulating clonal myelodysplastic syndrome cells in immunodeficient mice.

TitleEffect of intravenous coadministration of human stroma cell lines on engraftment of long-term repopulating clonal myelodysplastic syndrome cells in immunodeficient mice.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsLi X, Marcondes AM, Ragoczy T, Telling A, Deeg HJ
JournalBlood cancer journal
Volume3
Paginatione113
Date Published2013
Abstract

Engraftment of clonal hematopoietic precursor cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in immunodeficient mice has been difficult to achieve by intravenous (i.v.) injection. We used i.v. coadministration of the human marrow stroma cell line HS27a with CD34+ MDS cells in Nod.cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1wjll) (NSG) mice to provide signals that would facilitate engraftment. Hematopoietic cells from 24 MDS patients were transplanted. Cells from all patients were engrafted, and engraftment was documented in 44 of 46 evaluable mice (95%). Immunohistochemistry revealed human HS27a stroma colocalizing with human hematopoietic cells in mouse spleens. Human CD34+ precursors harvested from marrow and spleen of primary murine recipients, when combined with HS27a cells, were also engrafted successfully in secondary NSG recipients, showing persistence of the original clonal characteristics. This observation supports the concept that clonal markers were present in long-term repopulating cells. We suggest that HS27a stroma cells 'traveled' in direct contact with hematopoietic precursors and enabled their propagation. An essential signal for engraftment appears to be CD146, which is prominently expressed on HS27a cells. This xenotransplantation model will allow to further dissect signals that control engraftment of MDS cells and should be amenable to in vivo treatment studies.

DOI10.1124/dmd.113.052662
Alternate JournalBlood Cancer J