Letter from Our President - Fall 2012

November 2, 2012

Dr. Gary GoldsteinAt Kennedy Krieger Institute, we are inspired every day by children and adolescents who have the will to succeed, despite seemingly insurmountable circumstances. When 12-year-old Matthew Slattery emerged from a coma after a horrific car accident that left him with a traumatic brain injury, he could barely lift his finger. Through hard work with his therapists, the love and support of his family, and sheer determination, today, Matthew can talk and laugh again, and participate in many of the activities he’s always loved, from biking, to Boy Scouts, to camping.

Across the globe, a little boy in Africa was born with a developmental disability that neighbors believed was a bad omen for their people. His mother’s quest to find him treatment and a better life led her to Kennedy Krieger, where she found therapy for her son and help in seeking asylum.

Parents who come to Kennedy Krieger are the ones who refuse to accept hearing others say, “I’m sorry, there is nothing more we can do.” There is always something more we can do, whether that means finding ways to bring a child back after a brain injury, providing physical and occupational therapy to help a child with a developmental disability, or in the case of 6-year-old Maci Janiski who recovered from a seizure, using video games to turn the hard work of neurorehabilitation into fun.

Also in this issue: 18-year-old John Manison isn’t letting paralysis stop him from pursuing his athletic dreams. Aside from being a nationally ranked competitive swimmer, he ran in the Baltimore Marathon with the help of braces and canes.

Some may call them miracles, but it is really a combination of children and adolescents who are determined to work hard, families who do everything possible to help them, and employees who give their all to help patients and students unlock their potential.

Thank you,
Gary W. Goldstein, MD