News Brief

June 3, 2011

First Training Program in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Located at KKI 

Kennedy Krieger has became the first institution in the country to receive approval by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education for its training program for physicians specializing in neurodevelopmental disabilities. The category was recognized as a new subspecialty in 1999 by the American Board of Medical Specialties, largely through the efforts of faculty at Kennedy Krieger and Johns Hopkins. The four-year program will serve two trainees per year. Similar programs are being developed at medical schools across the country, including Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine in Ohio, Harvard University, Northwestern University in Chicago, Ohio State University and Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland.

Kennedy Krieger has long been dedicated to increasing the number of qualified specialists in the United States and abroad whose work is related to the care of children with developmental disabilities. Each year, more than 400 people, from all academic levels and disciplines ranging from audiology to social work, come to the Institute to train with renowned experts. 


Foster Parents Honored for Dedication to Children with CP

For the past 18 years, Gordon and Jackie Plumbley have opened their home in Clinton, MD to more than 50 foster children with cerebral palsy, shaken baby syndrome and other disabilities. Some of these children have spent nearly their entire childhoods in the Plumbley home, where they have been treated as one of the couple’s very own. The Plumbleys are regulars at Kennedy Krieger’s Phelps Center for Cerebral Palsy and Neurodevelopmental Medicine, which has provided multi-disciplinary treatment to the family’s many foster children. 

In May, the Plumbleys were honored as Foster Parents of the Year by the Metro Washington D.C. Council of Government. They attribute their success as foster parents to the capable staff at Kennedy Krieger who help nurture their children. “As a nurse, I can provide for children with special needs, but Kennedy Krieger gives them the best care possible,” says Jackie. 


KKI High School Educator Named Top Youth Entrepreneurial Teacher

Valerie Queen-Henry was selected in May by the Maryland Small Business Association as the state’s Top Youth Entrepreneurial Teacher for 2003. Ms. Queen-Henry’s dedication to her students shows in the success of the student-run operations at the school – a convenience store, credit union and boutique. Students began these companies with a viable business plan and learned every component of operating a successful business, including inventory, customer service and management. Ms. Queen-Henry also oversees the student-run mailing center, where students fold and stuff envelopes and apply labels. “I’m glad the SBA recognizes what we do here at KKHS,” she says. “This is just the beginning of the accomplishments we are going to achieve.” 


Lower School Student Places in Block Kids Competition 

A Kennedy Krieger Lower School student recently won third place recognition for his Lego creation in the national Block Kids contest, competing against students from seven states. Eleven-year-old Lee Soto first competed against fellow classmates at the Kennedy Krieger Lower and Middle School, creating the best Lego design related to construction, before taking his model of Baltimore landmarks to the regional competition. Lee’s design included such notable attractions as the Inner Harbor, YMCA of Central Maryland, Fort McHenry, the World Trade Center, the National Aquarium and a crane for the Port of Baltimore. The National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC) sponsors the Block Kids competition. In addition to the Lego creations, local construction professionals offered interactive demonstrations to the students in masonry, painting, dry wall application and electrical work. Lee was honored at the NAWIC dinner and award ceremony on June 17.