Kennedy Krieger Institute's Autism Campaign Receives National Acclaim

September 15, 2008
Ad Council Endorses Public Service Campaign for First National Autism Registry

(Baltimore, MD) Kennedy Krieger Institute announced today the launch of a new, national public service campaign to promote the Interactive Autism Network (known as the IAN Project), a web initiative funded by Autism Speaks. The campaign, which educates viewers on how the IAN Project is accelerating the pace of autism research by encouraging parents of children with autism to enroll, received a prestigious national endorsement from the Ad Council, a distinction awarded to independently produced public service announcements (PSAs).

The IAN Project PSA campaign consists of television, radio and print advertisements created by Kennedy Krieger Institute's marketing department in partnership with Outlaw Advertising of Baltimore, Maryland. The campaign is currently featured in the September/October issue of the Ad Council's Public Service Advertising Bulletin, which is distributed every two months to 21,000 media outlets across the nation and specifically reaches PSA directors in charge of choosing campaigns for their publication or station. In addition, the IAN Project PSA campaign is featured on the Ad Council's Web site at http://www.adcouncil.org/default.aspx?id=529.

The campaign entitled "Families: The Missing Piece of the Autism Puzzle?" directs the public to the Web site of the Interactive Autism Network (www.IANProject.org), where parents of children with autism can join the nationwide research effort. Through the campaign, Kennedy Krieger Institute hopes to prompt parents of children with autism to enroll in the IAN Project in order to get directly involved in autism research and learn more about studies that may benefit their children.

"By informing and educating even more families and researchers across the country about the IAN Project through this PSA campaign, we can continue to organize and mobilize the autism community's research efforts," said Dr. Gary Goldstein, President and CEO of Kennedy Krieger Institute, one of the nation's leaders in autism research, treatment and education.

Launched in April 2007 by the Kennedy Krieger Institute, the IAN Project facilitates the exploration of causes, treatments, and the search for a possible cure to autism. As an online network that links parents to researchers, the IAN Project is accelerating the pace of autism research in two important ways. First, parents the people who know the most about their child provide valuable data to researchers without having to leave their home or office. Second, children with autism are matched with local and national research studies for which they qualify.

The IAN Project is run by the Kennedy Krieger Institute and funded by Autism Speaks. Parents and researchers may participate and learn more about the initiative by visiting www.IANProject.org.

To request copies of the print, television or radio advertisements, please contact Elise Welker at (443) 923-7330 or welker@kennedykrieger.org.

About Autism

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is the nation's fastest growing developmental disorder, with current incidence rates estimated at 1 in 150 children. This year more children will be diagnosed with autism than AIDS, diabetes and cancer combined, yet profound gaps remain in our understanding of both the causes and cures of the disorder. Continued research and education about developmental disruptions in individuals with ASD is crucial, as early detection and intervention can lead to improved outcomes in individuals with ASD.

About the Kennedy Krieger Institute

Internationally recognized for improving the lives of children and adolescents with disorders and injuries of the brain and spinal cord, the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, MD serves more than 13,000 individuals each year through inpatient and outpatient clinics, home and community services and school-based programs. Kennedy Krieger provides a wide range of services for children with developmental concerns mild to severe, and is home to a team of investigators who are contributing to the understanding of how disorders develop while pioneering new interventions and earlier diagnosis. For more information on Kennedy Krieger Institute, visit www.kennedykrieger.org.

Media Inquiries:

Elise Welker
(443) 923-7330
welker@kennedykrieger.org