Potential Online

The Next Generation

Courtney
McGrath
Each Year, Hundreds of Professionals Come to Kennedy Krieger for Invaluable Training

Professional Training at Kennedy KriegerWhen today's Kennedy Krieger Institute first opened its doors in 1967, its leaders were expected to continue and improve the state-of-the-art treatment services already available to children with cerebral palsy at the Children's Rehabilitation Institute, the original facility that became Kennedy Krieger, and to extend those services to children with a variety of other neurodevelopment

Roots of A Dangerous Habit

Courtney
McGrath
New Study Investigates the Earliest Signs of Self-Injury in Children

Roots of a Dangerous HabitYoung children go through all sorts of phases, some of which can be alarming for parents. Tantrums, defiance, refusing to eat all can cause a great deal of stress. With time and patience, most of these habits fade quickly. A more disturbing problem for many families is self-injurious behavior like head banging, skin scratching or eye poking.

One Step at a Time

Allison
Eatough
Specialized Transition Program Paves the Way for Recovery and Independence

Ritchie JacobRiding a bicycle comes as second nature to most 15-year-old boys. But for Richie Jacob, it was a major milestone. Three months earlier, Richie couldn't walk. He could barely talk. Doctors gave him a 50 percent chance of survival.

Letter From Our President

Gary W. Goldstein, MDWith the holiday season fast approaching, I hope you and all of your loved ones are preparing for festive gatherings, full of family togetherness and hope for the New Year. Of course, in many of our families, food plays a central role in our enjoyment of these holiday traditions few celebrations are complete without experiencing the slight discomfort of consuming one dessert too many.

Against All Odds

Courtney
McGrath
Pre-Teen with Cerebral Palsy Defies Skeptics and Learns to Walk

The day Sheiku Koroma was born in 1994, his parents had no reason to anticipate the challenges he'd face growing up. He seemed healthy at first, like any other newborn. But a severe infection combined with increased newborn jaundice led to an injury in the basal ganglia region of his brain, an area controlling movement and speech. As a result, Sheiku developed extraparymidal cerebral palsy, which affects his entire body and is accompanied by uncontrollable movements called choreoathetosis.

Living the Possibility

Courtney
McGrath
Kennedy Krieger Spokesman Proves That Recovery Is Possible Following A Spinal Cord Injury

Patrick RummerfieldFor someone who has been paralyzed from the neck down, the idea of ever walking again, driving a car or even doing something as simple as giving a friend a hug probably seems like a distant dream.

Letter from our President

Gary W. Goldstein, MDMost of the children we treat at Kennedy Krieger deal with challenges created by disorders that no one could possibly have predicted or prevented. And while we can provide them with medications, therapies and other programs designed to help them live the most fulfilling lives possible, we are rarely able to completely remedy our patient's difficulties.

Research Frontiers: The Learning Curve

Anne
Hoffman
Kennedy Krieger awarded $9 million grant for Center for the Study of Reading Development.

Learning disabilities can be frustrating for the children who have them as well as for the parents trying to help. Not physically obvious, learning disabilities often create significant difficulties with academic and social skills when they are not properly identified or treated.

Reversing Paralysis

Courtney
McGrath
Led by World-Renowned Researcher Dr. John McDonald, A New Center at Kennedy Krieger Revolutionizes Care for Children with Spinal Cord Injuries and Paralysis through Activity-Based Therapy.

Reversing ParalysisFor years, people who suffered spinal cord injuries were told that the first six months of their recovery would paint an accurate picture of how they would live the rest of their lives. If a patient recovered any movement, it would probably be in those first few months and, nearly all experts believed, improvement after two years was impossible.

Letter From Our President

Gary W. Goldstein, MDFor many children with developmental disabilities, the struggle to communicate their wants, fears and joys can be an enormous challenge. Many are not verbal at all; others have a limited arsenal of words at their disposal. Inability to share their thoughts and feelings with others can lead to intense frustration, even angry and aggressive behavior. For these children, art and music can be powerful vehicles of self-expression.

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